first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Port Cities – Cape Breton, N.S.(@Port_Cities) Aquakultre, Haviah Mighty, Port Cities and smrtdeath Facebook Advertisement smrtdeath – Winnipeg, Man.(@sloppymakeout) Twitter For the first time, this year’s winners will be joined by the 2018 winner of CBC Music Searchlight competition, Aquakultre (@aquakultre).This year’s winners were selected by a super jury, including industry leaders Derrick Ross (President, Slaight Music), Erik Hoffman (President – Toronto, Live Nation), Gavin Brown (Producer, Golden Goes Platinum), Jordan Evans (Producer, Golden Child Recordings), Meg Symsyk, (Vice President, International Marketing & Management, Entertainment One) and Allan Reid (President & CEO, CARAS/The JUNO Awards & MusiCounts).“We are excited to announce this diverse group of winners as the next generation of Canadian musical talent,” said Derrick Ross, President, Slaight Music. “We look forward to watching the growth of these talented artists and the opportunities the Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class has in store.”“CARAS is extremely proud to be in its fourth year of the Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class and continue to support Canadian music through this valuable mentorship program,” said Allan Reid, President and CEO, CARAS/The JUNO Awards & MusiCounts. “It has been an incredible experience to see the success of graduates of the program in previous years and I look forward to seeing the development of the careers of this year’s group of artists.”The winning acts will receive an all-inclusive trip to Toronto for an intensive mentorship week hosted by Canada’s Music Incubator at Coalition Music with industry leaders and Canadian artists. This will conclude with a music industry showcase night in Toronto. Additionally, the winners will receive a trip to the 2019 JUNO Awards in London, Ont., that includes transportation, hotel, complete access to JUNO Week events, and a performance slot at JUNOfest Presented by CBC Music; a two-day music festival during JUNO Week. One artist will be selected to perform in front of over 1,200 music industry elite at the JUNO Gala Dinner & Awards. The winners will be featured in exclusive content that will run onJUNOTV.ca, as well as receive studio time at Slaight Music Recording Studios.Partners of the 2018/2019 Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class are Slaight Music, and Canada’s Music Incubator at Coalition Music.For photos of the Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class winners please click here.Website: www.junomasterclass.ca, www.junoawards.caThe JUNO Awards: @TheJUNOAwardsSlaight Music: @SlaightMusicCanada’s Music Incubator: @CMincubatorAbout Allan Slaight JUNO Master ClassThe Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class is an initiative that provides the crucial tools to help the three winners develop their careers, build their own sustainable business and become “JUNO ready.” The Master Class includes a week-long customized artist development program co-developed with Canada’s Music Incubator at Coalition Music. This development program provides hands-on mentoring, networking, and collaboration opportunities.About CARASThe Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences/L’académie canadienne des arts et des sciences de l’enregistrement (CARAS) is a not-for-profit organization created to preserve and enhance the Canadian music industry and to contribute toward higher artistic and industry standards. CARAS’ mandate is comprised of four key pillars: Educate through our music education charity MusiCounts programs and initiatives, Develop emerging artists through mentorship and development programs, Celebrate Canadian artists with year round JUNO Awards showcasing, and Honour music industry icons through the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. For more information on The 48th Annual JUNO Awards or The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) please visit junoawards.ca.About Allan SlaightA pioneer of rock and roll, Allan parlayed his entrepreneurial flair with his knowledge of radio to create Canada’s largest privately owned multi-media company, Standard Broadcasting Corporation Limited.Born in 1931, Allan hosted his own radio program, Spins and Needles, a late night jazz program, at age 16 at CHAB in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. He moved to Edmonton in 1950, working his way up the ladder being appointed in 1956 as the National Sales Manager at CHED. There he came to the attention Allan Waters, owner of CHUM Radio in Toronto, who hired Allan to turn around the fortunes of his struggling station. Allan’s programming, promotions, and business acumen propelled CHUM into a household name. Allan left the station in 1966 to coordinate programming and sales of Radio Caroline, the infamous pirate radio station. He returned to Canada in 1967, to become the President and General Manager of Stephens and Towndrow.In 1970, Allan established Slaight Communications and acquired radio stations CFGM in Toronto and CFOX in Montreal. In 1977, Allan launched a new rock and roll radio station, CILQ-FM, known as Q107, in Toronto. In 1985, Slaight Communications sold CFGM and Q107, and purchased Standard Broadcasting Corporation Limited from Conrad Black. Under Allan’s leadership, Standard Broadcasting and Standard Radio grew from seven radio stations to a national network of over fifty. In 2007, the Slaight’s sold Standard Broadcasting to Astral Media.Radio was not Allan’s only passion. He served as a trustee of Women’s College Hospital (1978- 1982), a director of the United Way of Greater Toronto (1979-1987), director of the Shaw Festival (1982-1988), a governor of York University (1986-1987), and a director of the Festival of Festival (1989-1993).An inductee into the Broadcast Hall of Fame (1997), the recipient of an Honorary Doctor of Commerce from Ryerson Polytechnic University (2000), appointed a Member of the Order of Canada (2001), the recipient of the Walt Grealis Special Achievement Award (2005) for his contribution to the growth and development of the Canadian music industry, Allan has also maintained a lifelong interest in conjuring.About Slaight MusicSlaight Music was started in 2011 with a mandate to support the Canadian music community through a variety of initiatives, and to develop Canadian talent via strategic partnerships with industry peers.About Canada’s Music IncubatorCanada’s Music Incubator (CMI) is a national not-for-profit organization based in Toronto specializing in customized professional development and ongoing mentorship for artists and artist managers. CMI’s mission is to empower creative entrepreneurs, across all genres, in the development of sustainable careers and businesses, which meet their definitions of success. CMI also curates live events for partner organizations, which provide paid performance opportunities for artists, and works with industry partners, community organizations and all levels of government to support music sector infrastructure development. Since 2012, CMI has delivered over 5,000 hours of in-house and custom third-party professional development programs and actively mentors hundreds of artists and managers across Canada. TORONTO – The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) andSlaight Music today announced the winners of this year’s Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class: Haviah Mighty, Port Cities and smrtdeath. The winners, selected by a “super jury” of music industry leaders, will receive support from Canada’s premier artist development program allowing them to transform their careers with crucial tools and invaluable experiences.2018/2019 Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class winners: Login/Register With: Haviah Mighty – Brampton, Ont.(@HaviahMighty)last_img read more

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement Martin Short (Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images) Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Good People is set at a university and focuses on three generations of women working in the school ombudsman’s office, headed by Kudrow’s character. It will follow them as they “navigate the current cultural climate, the concept of feminism across different generations, and the struggle to reconcile socially constructed ideas with current ethical views regarding complex issues such as sex, race, class and gender,” per Amazon’s logline. Twitter The Emmy winner is the latest addition to ‘Good People,’ from creators Lee Daniels and Whitney Cummings.Lee Daniels and Whitney Cummings are assembling an all-star cast for their Amazon comedy pilot Good People.Martin Short is the latest actor to join the project, following on the heels of Lisa Kudrow and Greg Kinnear (co-creator Cummings also has an onscreen role).last_img read more

first_imgAPTN National NewsTwo APTN National News reporters were nominated for Canadian Association of Journalists awards handed out this past weekend.Tiar Wilson was nominated for her story about a massive beaver dam that could be seen from outer space.Tiar spoke with elders who explained that the animal world can send us warnings about environmental threats.Larissa Burnouf was nominated for her extensive coverage of First Nations University of Canada.APTN National News broke the story about cuts in funding to FNUC and Larissa covered the story until the school was eventually saved.last_img read more

first_imgAPTN National NewsAn editorial published in a small Winnipeg newspaper, sparked all kinds of controversy over the weekend.The article slammed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, called out First Nations leaders and called First Nation sovereignty a “legal fiction.”APTN’s Jaydon Flett has the story.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsA British Columbia man who was assaulted while in a police jail cell by an RCMP officer has settled his case out of court.But his family is still seeking justice for the assault that left him with permanent brain damage.APTN’s Tina House has this story.last_img

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsSuzanne Patles is one of 89 people named in the RCMP intelligence report on Indigenous activists dubbed Project Sitka.And Patles says she doesn’t mind at all.She was heavily involved in resisting the fracking exploration by an American company near Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick three years ago.last_img

first_imgWASHINGTON – It was just before noon in Moscow on March 10, 2016, when the first volley of malicious messages hit the Hillary Clinton campaign.The first 29 phishing emails were almost all misfires. Addressed to people who worked for Clinton during her first presidential run, the messages bounced back untouched.Except one.Within nine days, some of the campaign’s most consequential secrets would be in the hackers’ hands, part of a massive operation aimed at vacuuming up millions of messages from thousands of inboxes across the world.An Associated Press investigation into the digital break-ins that disrupted the U.S. presidential contest has sketched out an anatomy of the hack that led to months of damaging disclosures about the Democratic Party’s nominee. It wasn’t just a few aides that the hackers went after; it was an all-out blitz across the Democratic Party. They tried to compromise Clinton’s inner circle and more than 130 party employees, supporters and contractors.While U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia was behind the email thefts, the AP drew on forensic data to report Thursday that the hackers known as Fancy Bear were closely aligned with the interests of the Russian government.The AP’s reconstruction— based on a database of 19,000 malicious links recently shared by cybersecurity firm Secureworks — shows how the hackers worked their way around the Clinton campaign’s top-of-the-line digital security to steal chairman John Podesta’s emails in March 2016.It also helps explain how a Russian-linked intermediary could boast to a Trump policy adviser, a month later, that the Kremlin had “thousands of emails” worth of dirt on Clinton.____PHISHING FOR VICTIMSThe rogue messages that first flew across the internet March 10 were dressed up to look like they came from Google, the company that provided the Clinton campaign’s email infrastructure. The messages urged users to boost their security or change their passwords while in fact steering them toward decoy websites designed to collect their credentials.One of the first people targeted was Rahul Sreenivasan, who had worked as a Clinton organizer in Texas in 2008 — his first paid job in politics. Sreenivasan, now a legislative staffer in Austin, was dumbfounded when told by the AP that hackers had tried to break into his 2008 email — an address he said had been dead for nearly a decade.“They probably crawled the internet for this stuff,” he said.Almost everyone else targeted in the initial wave was, like Sreenivasan, a 2008 staffer whose defunct email address had somehow lingered online.But one email made its way to the account of another staffer who’d worked for Clinton in 2008 and joined again in 2016, the AP found. It’s possible the hackers broke in and stole her contacts; the data shows the phishing links sent to her were clicked several times.Secureworks’ data reveals when phishing links were created and indicates whether they were clicked. But it doesn’t show whether people entered their passwords.Within hours of a second volley emailed March 11, the hackers hit pay dirt. All of a sudden, they were sending links aimed at senior Clinton officials’ nonpublic 2016 addresses, including those belonging to longtime Clinton aide Robert Russo and campaign chairman John Podesta.The Clinton campaign was no easy target; several former employees said the organization put particular stress on digital safety.Work emails were protected by two-factor authentication, a technique that uses a second passcode to keep accounts secure. Most messages were deleted after 30 days and staff went through phishing drills. Security awareness even followed the campaigners into the bathroom, where someone put a picture of a toothbrush under the words: “You shouldn’t share your passwords either.”Two-factor authentication may have slowed the hackers, but it didn’t stop them. After repeated attempts to break into various staffers’ hillaryclinton.com accounts, the hackers turned to the personal Gmail addresses. It was there on March 19 that they targeted top Clinton lieutenants — including campaign manager Robby Mook, senior adviser Jake Sullivan and political fixer Philippe Reines.A malicious link was generated for Podesta at 11:28 a.m. Moscow time, the AP found. Documents subsequently published by WikiLeaks show that the rogue email arrived in his inbox six minutes later. The link was clicked twice.Podesta’s messages — at least 50,000 of them — were in the hackers’ hands.___A SERIOUS BREACHThough the heart of the campaign was now compromised, the hacking efforts continued. Three new volleys of malicious messages were generated on the 22nd, 23rd and 25th of March, targeting communications director Jennifer Palmieri and Clinton confidante Huma Abedin, among others.The torrent of phishing emails caught the attention of the FBI, which had spent the previous six months urging the Democratic National Committee in Washington to raise its shield against suspected Russian hacking. In late March, FBI agents paid a visit to Clinton’s Brooklyn headquarters, where they were received warily, given the agency’s investigation into the candidate’s use of a private email server while secretary of state.The phishing messages also caught the attention of Secureworks, a subsidiary of Dell Technologies, which had been following Fancy Bear, whom Secureworks codenamed Iron Twilight.Fancy Bear had made a critical mistake.It fumbled a setting in the Bitly link-shortening service that it was using to sneak its emails past Google’s spam filter. The blunder exposed whom they were targeting.It was late March when Secureworks discovered the hackers were going after Democrats.“As soon as we started seeing some of those hillaryclinton.com email addresses coming through, the DNC email addresses, we realized it’s going to be an interesting twist to this,” said Rafe Pilling, a senior security researcher with Secureworks.By early April Fancy Bear was getting increasingly aggressive, the AP found. More than 60 bogus emails were prepared for Clinton campaign and DNC staffers on April 6 alone, and the hackers began hunting for Democrats beyond New York and Washington, targeting the digital communications director for Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf and a deputy director in the office of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.The group’s hackers seemed particularly interested in Democratic officials working on voter registration issues: Pratt Wiley, the DNC’s then-director of voter protection, had been targeted as far back as October 2015 and the hackers tried to pry open his inbox as many as 15 times over six months.Employees at several organizations connected to the Democrats were targeted, including the Clinton Foundation, the Center for American Progress, technology provider NGP VAN, campaign strategy firm 270 Strategies, and partisan news outlet Shareblue Media.As the hacking intensified, other elements swung into place. On April 12, 2016, someone paid $37 worth of bitcoin to the Romanian web hosting company THCServers.com , to reserve a website called Electionleaks.com, according to transaction records obtained by AP. A botched registration meant the site never got off the ground, but the records show THC received a nearly identical payment a week later to create DCLeaks.com.By the second half of April, the DNC’s senior leadership was beginning to realize something was amiss. One DNC consultant, Alexandra Chalupa, received an April 20 warning from Yahoo saying her account was under threat from state-sponsored hackers, according to a screengrab she circulated among colleagues.The Trump campaign had gotten a whiff of Clinton email hacking, too. According to recently unsealed court documents, former Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos said that it was at an April 26 meeting at a London hotel that he was told by a professor closely connected to the Russian government that the Kremlin had obtained compromising information about Clinton.“They have dirt on her,” Papadopoulos said he was told. “They have thousands of emails.”A few days later, Amy Dacey, then the DNC chief executive, got an urgent call.There’d been a serious breach at the DNC.___‘DON’T EVEN TALK TO YOUR DOG ABOUT IT’It was 4 p.m. on Friday June 10 when some 100 staffers filed into the Democratic National Committee’s main conference room for a mandatory, all-hands meeting.“What I am about to tell you cannot leave this room,” DNC chief operating officer Lindsey Reynolds told the assembled crowd, according to two people there at the time.Everyone needed to turn in their laptops immediately; there would be no last-minute emails; no downloading documents and no exceptions. Reynolds insisted on total secrecy.“Don’t even talk to your dog about it,” she was quoted as saying.Reynolds didn’t return messages seeking comment.Two days later, as the cybersecurity firm that was brought in to clean out the DNC’s computers finished its work, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange told a British Sunday television show that emails related to Clinton were “pending publication.”“WikiLeaks has a very good year ahead,” he said.On Tuesday, June 14, the Democrats went public with the allegation that their computers had been compromised by Russian state-backed hackers, including Fancy Bear.Shortly after noon the next day, William Bastone, the editor-in-chief of investigative news site The Smoking Gun, got an email bearing a small cache of documents marked “CONFIDENTIAL.”“Hi,” the message said. “This is Guccifer 2.0 and this is me who hacked Democratic National Committee.”___‘CAN IT INFLUENCE THE ELECTION?’Guccifer 2.0 acted as a kind of master of ceremonies during the summer of leaks, proclaiming that the DNC’s stolen documents were in WikiLeaks’ hands, publishing a selection of the material himself and constantly chatting up journalists over Twitter in a bid to keep the story in the press.He appeared particularly excited to hear on June 24 that his leaks had sparked a lawsuit against the DNC by disgruntled supporters of Clinton rival Bernie Sanders.“Can it influence the election in any how?” he asked a journalist with Russia’s Sputnik News, in uneven English.Later that month Guccifer 2.0 began directing reporters to the newly launched DCLeaks site, which was also dribbling out stolen material on Democrats. When WikiLeaks joined the fray on July 22 with its own disclosures the leaks metastasized into a crisis, triggering intraparty feuding that forced the resignation of the DNC’s chairwoman and drew angry protests at the Democratic National Convention.Guccifer 2.0, WikiLeaks and DCLeaks ultimately published more than 150,000 emails stolen from more than a dozen Democrats, according to an AP count.The AP has since found that each of one of those Democrats had previously been targeted by Fancy Bear, either at their personal Gmail addresses or via the DNC, a finding established by running targets’ emails against the Secureworks’ list.All three leak-branded sites have distanced themselves from Moscow. DCLeaks claimed to be run by American hacktivists. WikiLeaks said Russia wasn’t its source. Guccifer 2.0 claimed to be Romanian.But there were signs of dishonesty from the start. The first document Guccifer 2.0 published on June 15 came not from the DNC as advertised but from Podesta’s inbox , according to a former DNC official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press.The official said the word “CONFIDENTIAL” was not in the original document .Guccifer 2.0 had airbrushed it to catch reporters’ attention.___‘PLEASE GOD, DON’T LET IT BE ME’To hear the defeated candidate tell it, there’s no doubt the leaks helped swing the election.“Even if Russian interference made only a marginal difference,” Clinton told an audience at a recent speech at Stanford University, “this election was won at the margins, in the Electoral College.”It’s clear Clinton’s campaign was profoundly destabilized by the sudden exposures that regularly radiated from every hacked inbox. It wasn’t just her arch-sounding speeches to Wall Street executives or the exposure of political machinations but also the brutal stripping of so many staffers’ privacy.“It felt like your friend had just been robbed, but it wasn’t just one friend, it was all your friends at the same time by the same criminal,” said Jesse Ferguson, a former Clinton spokesman.An atmosphere of dread settled over the Democrats as the disclosures continued.One staffer described walking through the DNC’s office in Washington to find employees scrolling through articles about Putin and Russia. Another said she began looking over her shoulder when returning from Clinton headquarters in Brooklyn after sundown. Some feared they were being watched; a car break-in, a strange woman found lurking in a backyard late at night and even a snake spotted on the grounds of the DNC all fed an undercurrent of fear.Even those who hadn’t worked at Democratic organizations for years were anxious. Brent Kimmel, a former technologist at the DNC, remembers watching the leaks stream out and thinking: “Please God, don’t let it be me.”___‘MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN’On Oct. 7, it was Podesta.The day began badly, with Hillary Clinton’s phone buzzing with crank messages after its number was exposed in a leak from the day before. The number had to be changed immediately; a former campaign official said that Abedin, Clinton’s confidante, had to call staffers one at a time with Clinton’s new contact information because no one dared put it in an email.The same afternoon, just as the American electorate was digesting a lewd audio tape of Trump boasting about sexually assaulting women, WikiLeaks began publishing the emails stolen from Podesta.The publications sparked a media stampede as they were doled out one batch at a time, with many news organizations tasking reporters with scrolling through the thousands of emails being released in tranches. At the AP alone, as many as 30 journalists were assigned, at various times, to go through the material.Guccifer 2.0 told one reporter he was thrilled that WikiLeaks had finally followed through.“Together with Assange we’ll make america great again,” he wrote.___Donn reported from Plymouth, Massachusetts. Desmond Butler, Ted Bridis, Julie Pace and Ken Thomas in Washington, Justin Myers in Chicago, Frank Bajak in Houston, Lori Hinnant in Paris, Maggie Michael in Cairo, Erika Kinetz in Shanghai and Vadim Ghirda in Bucharest, Romania contributed to this report.___Editor’s Note: Satter’s father, David Satter, is an author and Russia specialist who has been critical of the Russian government. Several of his emails were published last year by hackers and his address is on Secureworks’ list.___Previously in this series: http://apne.ws/b8By82Blast_img read more

first_imgWASHINGTON – Under fire for the worst privacy debacle in his company’s history, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg batted away often-aggressive questioning Tuesday from lawmakers who accused him of failing to protect the personal information of millions of Americans from Russians intent on upsetting the U.S. election.During some five hours of Senate questioning, Zuckerberg apologized several times for Facebook failures, disclosed that his company was “working with” special counsel Robert Mueller in the federal probe of Russian election interference and said it was working hard to change its own operations after the harvesting of users’ private data by a data-mining company affiliated with Donald Trump’s campaign.Seemingly unimpressed, Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota said Zuckerberg’s company had a 14-year history of apologizing for “ill-advised decisions” related to user privacy. “How is today’s apology different?” Thune asked.“We have made a lot of mistakes in running the company,” Zuckerberg conceded, and Facebook must work harder at ensuring the tools it creates are used in “good and healthy” ways.The controversy has brought a flood of bad publicity and sent the company’s stock value plunging, but Zuckerberg seemed to achieve a measure of success in countering that: Facebook shares surged 4.5 per cent for the day, the biggest gain in two years.In all, he skated largely unharmed through his first day of congressional testimony. He’ll face House questioners Wednesday.The 33-year-old founder of the world’s best-known social media giant appeared in a suit and tie, a departure from the T-shirt he’s famous for wearing in public as well as in private. Even so, his youth cast a sharp contrast with his often-elderly, grey-haired Senate inquisitors. And the enormous complexity of the social network he created at times defeated the attempts of legislators to hammer him on Facebook’s specific failures and how to fix them.The stakes are high for both Zuckerberg and his company. Facebook has been reeling from its worst-ever privacy failure following revelations last month that the political data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica, which was affiliated with Trump’s 2016 campaign, improperly scooped up data on some 87 million users. Zuckerberg has been on an apology tour for most of the past two weeks, culminating in his congressional appearance Tuesday.Although shaky at times, Zuckerberg seemed to gain confidence as the day progressed. An iconic figure as a billionaire entrepreneur who changed the way people around the world relate to each other, he made a point of repeatedly referring back to the Harvard dorm room where he said Facebook was brought to life.At times, he showed plenty of steel. After a round of aggressive questioning about Facebook’s alleged political bias from Sen. Ted Cruz, for instance, Zuckerberg grinned and almost chuckled. “That was pretty good,” he said of the exchange with Cruz.For the most part, his careful but generally straightforward answers, steeped in the sometimes arcane details of Facebook’s underlying functions, often deflected aggressive questioning. When the going got tough, Zuckerberg was able to fall back on: “Our team should follow up with you on that, Senator.”As a result, he found it relatively easy to return to familiar talking points: Facebook made mistakes, he and his executives are very sorry, and they’re working very hard to correct the problems and safeguard the users’ data.As for the federal Russia probe that has occupied much of Washington’s attention for months, he said he had not been interviewed by special counsel Mueller’s team, but “I know we’re working with them.” He offered no details, citing a concern about confidentiality rules of the investigation.Earlier this year Mueller charged 13 Russian individuals and three Russian companies in a plot to interfere in the 2016 presidential election through a social media propaganda effort that included online ad purchases using U.S. aliases and politicking on U.S. soil. A number of the Russian ads were on Facebook.Much of the effort was aimed at denigrating Democrat Hillary Clinton and thereby helping Republican Trump, or simply encouraging divisiveness and undercutting faith in the U.S. system.Zuckerberg said Facebook had been led to believe Cambridge Analytica had deleted the user data it had harvested and that had been “clearly a mistake.” He said Facebook had considered the data collection “a closed case” and had not alerted the Federal Trade Commission. He assured senators the company would handle the situation differently today.Separately, the company began alerting some of its users that their data was gathered by Cambridge Analytica. A notification that appeared on Facebook for some users Tuesday told them that “one of your friends” used Facebook to log into a now-banned personality quiz app called “This Is Your Digital Life.” The notice says the app misused the information, including public profiles, page likes, birthdays and current cities, by sharing it with Cambridge Analytica.In the hearings, Zuckerberg is trying to both restore public trust in his company and stave off federal regulations that some lawmakers have floated.Democrat Bill Nelson of Florida said he believes Zuckerberg was taking the congressional hearings seriously “because he knows there is going to be a hard look at regulation.”Republicans have yet to get behind any legislation, but that could change.Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., asked Zuckerberg if he would be willing to work with lawmakers to examine what “regulations you think are necessary in your industry.”Absolutely, Zuckerberg responded, saying later in an exchange with Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, that “I’m not the type of person who thinks that all regulation is bad.”Ahead of the hearing, John Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, said, “This is a serious matter, and I think people expect us to take action.”At the hearing, Zuckerberg said: “We didn’t take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I’m sorry. I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here.”He outlined steps the company has taken to restrict outsiders’ access to people’s personal information. He also said the company is investigating every app that had access to a large amount of information before the company moved to prevent such access in 2014 — actions that came too late in the Cambridge Analytica case.___Associated Press writers Richard Lardner and Lisa Mascaro contributed to this report. Ortutay reported from New York. Hamilton reported from San Francisco.___For complete coverage of the Facebook privacy scandal, visit https://apnews.com/tag/FacebookPrivacyScandallast_img read more

first_imgOAKVILLE, Ont. – Tim Hortons’s franchisee advisory board has waded into a war of words between the brand’s parent company and an outspoken restaurant owners association, attacking the group for publicly slandering the company and making complaints about it to the federal government and in the media.In a letter sent to fellow franchisees this week, the board says recent “negative commentary,” much of which stemmed from the Great White North Franchisee Association’s criticism, is “corrosive and damaging to our brand, our livelihoods and that of our teams.”The franchisee advisory board has 19 elected members — all whom signed the letter — who liaise with company executives and advocate on behalf of franchisees.The letter was triggered by the relationship between parent company Restaurant Brands International and the GWNFA, which became tense over the last few months, after the association attacked RBI for cost-cutting measures in the wake of Ontario’s minimum wage hike, cash register outages and a $700-million renovation plan to spruce up restaurants. Their spat intensified in April, when a federal investigation was triggered after GWNFA wrote to Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains alleging RBI had failed to live up to promises made under the Investment Canada Act in 2014, when Tim Hortons was merged with Burger King to create RBI.The letter called GWNFA’s plea for a government investigation “a final straw.”“Without a doubt, this media attention has affected our brand in the eyes of the public – it has caused the public to watch and consider us more critically than they may have once done,” the letter said.“This second look has exposed issues that may have previously existed but were forgiven or overlooked. Issues such as service, accuracy or operational execution to name a few.”The board said it feared the public wrongfully perceives that GWNFA speaks for all franchisees and warned that “our guests are voting with their feet.”It noted that Tim Hortons had plunged from the fourth spot to the fiftieth in a recent annual brand reputation rankings survey looking at Canada’s most adored companies.RBI’s stock also took a dive, reaching its lowest point this month since September 2017 as internal strife between the GWNFA and the company became public.In an emailed statement, RBI noted it didn’t have anything to say about communications between the sparring franchisee factions, but said it was committed “to improving our relationship with all of our franchise owners.”“We realize we have work to do, and welcome all opportunities for dialogue with franchisees in pursuit of that goal,” the statement added.Earlier this week, Tim Hortons president Alex Macedo told The Canadian Press the company has a “good” rapport with the franchisee advisory board.On the topic of the letter GWNFA sent to Bains citing issues with RBI’s commitments to maintain franchisee relationships, the company’s rent and royalty structure for five years and existing employment levels at franchises across Canada, Macedo said only that “we have reported into Ottawa each and every year with everything we have done and we are happy to co-operate if anything comes up.”The GWNFA did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Board member Lou Gossner would not agree to an interview on the letter, but said in an email that “we look forward to moving past our recent differences and getting back to doing what we love: serving our guests, our team members and our communities.”Companies in this story: (TSX:QSR)last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA – The federal government has unveiled new measures on intellectual property as it seeks to improve Canada’s performance in a critical area of the increasingly important ideas-based economy.Intellectual property, or IP, is about owning, protecting and making money from an idea in any sector through intangible assets like patents, trademarks and copyrights.In launching the government’s long-awaited strategy Thursday, Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains called IP the most valuable business asset in the knowledge economy.In its recent budget, the Liberal government committed about $85 million over five years towards a strategy.Thursday’s release follows warnings that Canada has been a laggard on the international stage when it comes to IP development. Some industry and academic leaders say the country’s entrepreneurs, companies and the wider economy have been at a disadvantage, particularly when compared to big IP players like the United States and China.Only 10 per cent of small- and medium-sized businesses in Canada have IP and only nine per cent of them have IP strategies, Bains noted.Ottawa is also hoping to address what it calls “bad behaviour” in the country’s existing IP regime with help from legislative amendments to curb intimidation and inappropriate “trolling” of some businesses by patent holders.Here are several ways the federal government says it will improve the IP in Canada:— Stamping out misuse and eliminating barriers surrounding IP. The government is pledging to eliminate obstacles for innovative companies by amending key laws for patents, copyrights and trademarks. Proposed changes to the Patent Act would discourage IP owners from sending deceptive or vague notices to businesses alleging patent infringement. In the past, such notices have been used to unfairly intimidate firms and sometimes demand they pay settlements for alleged IP infringement. Under the changes, the government says settlement demands will be removed from the so-called notice-and-notice regime.“This was designed, really, as an educational measure — the idea that people would become more aware of the limits of copyright,” University of Ottawa law professor and IP expert Michael Geist said of the original purpose of the system. “It was never intended to be used to include settlement demands.”The proposed changes will also look to address the practice of “trademark squatting,” where people misuse the system by hanging onto a trademark they have no intention of using themselves, such as an internet domain name, to sell it at a later date for profit.— Better tools to expand the use of IP. Ottawa aims to give businesses the tools they need to pursue their own IP strategies. For example, it will provide $18.7 million over five years to help make the processes for dispute resolution and copyright tariffs cheaper and more efficient for IP owners and users. The government will also provide funds to help innovative Canadian firms leverage their IP — and increase revenues — by making sure their patented technologies comply with international standards. The plan has also provided more details about the creation of a new, $30-million patent collective, which was announced in the budget and will enable companies to pool and share their IP as well as their IP strategies.— Increasing awareness, literacy and sophistication surrounding IP. The plan also includes several ways to help Canadians better understand IP. Examples include $1 million over five years to support clinics that help law students lean more about IP, access to advisers and online tools to help demystify the IP process via the Canadian Intellectual Property Office. and $2 million over three years for surveys to gauge how well Canadians understand and use IP, with a focus on those less likely to use it such as female and Indigenous entrepreneurs.“They may seem small but their potential impact is huge,” said University of Windsor law professor Myra Tawfik, an expert on the subject who has been advocating for the IP law clinics for a long time.“We’re encouraging — especially on university campuses — students to come up with the next best idea that they’ll be able to commercialize and, of course, will then lead to Canada’s growth and prosperity. And yet we’re not providing them with the entire menu of resources and tools that they need — most especially, intellectual-property legal advice.”She said there are really only two law clinics in Canada that provide IP searches and advice, while in the U.S. there are hundreds.Overall, Tawfik said, the various measures in the IP strategy are “quite significant” and could help Canada catch up with other jurisdictions around the world.“You’ve got to recognize that none of these things have really been in place before (in Canada),” she said.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version omitted Myra Tawfik’s first name and title.last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says a frozen food company is recalling a line of chicken strips in British Columbia and the Prairies due to possible bacterial contamination.Pinty’s Delicious Foods Inc.’s oven roasted chicken breast strips have been recalled from B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba following tests by the CFIA.The agency says the pre-cooked fare may be contaminated with a strain of Listeria.The recalled cutlets were from two batches with best-before dates of Aug. 9 and Aug. 15.CFIA warns that the food may not look or smell spoiled but can still lead to sickness.The agency says that pregnant and elderly people are particularly at risk. Symptoms can include nausea, fever and muscle aches.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version identified Health Canada as the origin of the recall.last_img read more

first_imgWASHINGTON — President Donald Trump plans to meet briefly Tuesday with the heads of three leading German automakers.The meeting comes at a time of elevated U.S.-European trade tensions in which car exports have been a focus. Trump has threatened to slap tariffs on auto imports from Europe and other countries, citing U.S. trade deficits with those nations.The White House says economic advisers are meeting with Volkswagen, Daimler and BMW to discuss investment opportunities in the U.S., including in manufacturing and research and development.White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump will meet briefly with the auto executives.German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Monday in Berlin dismissed suggestions that the automakers could conduct trade diplomacy. Merkel stressed that trade negotiations are a responsibility for the European Union.Darlene Superville, The Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgIndex and currency in this story: (TSX:GSPTSE, TSX:CADUSD=X) The Canadian Press TORONTO — Canada’s main stock index climbed higher in late-morning trading, boosted by the energy sector which benefited from higher oil prices.The S&P/TSX composite index was up 77.21 points at 14,494.10.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 180.44 points at 23,856.08. The S&P 500 index was up 19.45 points at 2,565.61, while the Nasdaq composite was up 46.54 points at 6,830.45.The Canadian dollar traded for 74.52 cents US compared with an average of 74.33 cents US on Tuesday.The February crude contract was up US$1.56 at US$48.16 per barrel and the January natural gas contract was down 25.8 cents at US$3.58 per mmBTU.The February gold contract was up US$5 at US$1,258.60 an ounce and the March copper contract was up 2.40 cents at US$2.69 a pound.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: In a first-of-its-kind initiative, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences Friday launched mobile methadone vans to provide treatment to opioid addicts in inner city neighbourhoods.As a pilot project, the National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC) of AIIMS has initiated the new service of delivering methadone through a mobile van in East Delhi. Opioid addiction is a significant problem in India, professor at NDDTC Dr Atul Ambekar said, adding these people require medicines such as methadone or buprenorphine for getting rid of the addiction. Methadone is a prescription drug given in a syrup form to patients as it helps in controlling the craving and withdrawals due to opioid addiction. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderThe drug usually comes in liquid form but is also available in powder and tablet variants. It is usually taken under the supervision of a doctor because of its potential for abuse, Ambekar said. There are very few treatment centres providing these medicines while the need is very high. It is estimated that less than 2 per cent of the population addicted to opioids in India is receiving this treatment, which is recommended by various UN bodies and the World Health Organization (WHO),” Ambekar said. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsA recently released government survey report “Prevalence and Extent of Substance Use in India”, estimated that India has about 28 lakh people affected by addiction to opioids such as heroin, opium and various pharmaceutical products. Since methadone is a highly regulated medicine, it is only provided as daily observed treatment. It is available in just about a dozen cities in India, in-charge of the methadone clinic at NDDTC Dr Ravindra Rao said. “Patients often find it difficult to come to the clinic daily to receive methadone, which leads to them dropping-out of treatment midway,” Rao informed. The mobile methadone dispensing unit plans to bridge this gap and improve retention of patients into treatment enabling them to work and lead a healthier life, Dr Rao said. Currently, such dispensing vans or buses are available in few select developed countries in the world, such as USA, Portugal, Spain, Canada and Netherlands. With the launch of mobile delivery of methadone, India joins this elite club, he said. In fact, India is the first country in the South Asian region to initiate these services, Rao claimed. The van will be parked at strategic places in East Delhi and adjoining areas for fixed time period in the day where the patients can come and receive their medicine without having to travel to the main clinic. “In the trial run for the last two weeks, we already have more than two dozen patients enrolled in the facility and the response is very encouraging,” he said.last_img read more

first_imgLondon: Uncapped pacer Jofra Archer was the only surprise absentee from England’s preliminary 15-man World Cup squad, although he was named in the team for warm-up games against Pakistan and Ireland. After a change in residency rules, Barbados-born Archer, 24, had qualified to play for England. “The selection panel has been impressed with Archer’s performances in domestic and franchise cricket,” national selector Ed Smith was quoted as saying by BBC. “He is a talented and exciting cricketer,” Smith remarked. Archer, currently playing in the Indian Premier League (IPL) for Rajasthan Royals, will now look to impress in the warm-up games as changes to squad can be made until May 23. England will play a match with Ireland on May 3 before a five-match series against Pakistan. The preliminary World Cup squad is unchanged from the winter one-day series against the West Indies.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: A Nigerian, arrested for allegedly possessing drugs, has been sentenced to 3-year imprisonment by a Delhi court for illegally staying in India since 2016 without a valid visa.Additional Sessions Judge Rajesh Kumar Singh convicted Darlington Chiemezie under section 14 (staying in India after the expiry of visa) of the Foreigners Act and said that he be deported to his country after completion of his sentence. “The accused did not claim that he had entered India on a valid visa or that at the relevant time, he had a valid visa. He also did not produce his passport,” the court said. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh”It has also been seen that even if his contention that he had come to India in 2015 on a visa valid for six months is accepted, the inescapable conclusion is that at the time of his apprehension and arrest in this case, he had no valid visa for his stay in India. He committed the offence under section 14 of the Foreigners Act and the prosecution has successfully proved this charge beyond reasonable doubt,” it said in a recent order. The court also imposed a fine of Rs 10,000 on the convict. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroadChiemezie was arrested in October 2016 for allegedly possessing contraband drugs. The police claimed that cocaine weighing 104 grams was recovered from him. However, the court has acquitted him for the charges of illegal possession of contraband drugs. During questioning, he could not produce valid visa for his entry and stay here. According to the prosecution, the police had written letters to the Foreigner’s Regional Registration Office (FRRO) and to Nigerian High Commission but no information could be obtained regarding his entry and exit from the country.last_img read more

first_imgWashington: A former CIA officer has been jailed for 20 years for disclosing military secrets to a Chinese agent in return for $25,000, bringing to a close one of several cases involving Chinese bids to recruit former American intelligence officers, the media reported. Kevin Mallory, 62, was found guilty of several spying offences following a two-week trial in June 2018 and sentenced by a federal judge in Northern Virginia on Friday, the New York Times reported. Prosecutors said that he provided a Chinese intelligence officer with classified documents, a violation of the Espionage Act. The fluent Mandarin speaker from Leesburg, Virginia, held top-level security clearance and had access to sensitive documents. He was convicted of selling secrets to China for $25,000. Evidence at his trial included a surveillance video which showed him scanning classified documents onto a digital memory card at a post office. He also travelled to Shanghai to meet a Chinese agent in March and April 2017, the US Justice Department said. “Mallory not only put our country at great risk, but he endangered the lives of specific human assets who put their own safety at risk for our national defence,” said G. Zachary Terwilliger, US Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia. “This case should send a message to anyone considering violating the public’s trust and compromising our national security. We will remain steadfast and dogged in pursuit of these challenging but critical national security cases,” added the attorney. The Justice Department said Mallory held a number of sensitive jobs with government agencies. He had worked as a covert case officer for the Central Intelligence Agency and as an intelligence officer for the Defence intelligence Agency (DIA). “This case is one in an alarming trend of former US intelligence officers being targeted by China and betraying their country and colleagues,” said Assistant Attorney General John Demers following the sentencing. Earlier this month, former CIA agent Jerry Chun Shing Lee pleaded guilty to spying for China. Prosecutors said the naturalized American citizen was paid to divulge information on US covert assets. Last June, former US intelligence officer Ron Rockwell Hansen was also charged with attempting to spy for China.last_img read more

Rabat – A video posted on YouTube on Monday shows a young Moroccan street vendor in Dchira, Inzegan near Agadir, going half-naked in public while threatening to kill himself.The street vendor took off his clothes – remaining only in his boxer shorts – in a protest of the authorities’ decision to ban street vendors from selling their products on main streets.The man held a knife and threatened that he would stab himself if the authorities tried to touch him or take his vegetables and fruits he was selling. A group of bystanders gathered around the angry street vendor while the authorities tried to stop him from hurting himself.The man was in a hysterical state, screaming and yelling at the authorities to stay away from him and allow him to sell his vegetables and fruits.Moroccan authorities are once again cracking down on street vendors, saying they have to stay free of public places and pedestrian walkways.Last month, 42-year-old street vendor named Fateeha, covered her body with paint thinner and set herself on fire in Kenitra after local officers confiscated her goods.The Moroccan activists called on the government to restructure the sector of street vendors instead of waging war against them, given the large number of vendors affected by the government’s position.According to study carried out by the Ministry of Industry, Trade and NewTechnologies in 2013, roughly 240,000 street vendors in Morocco’s towns and cities were the ones bringing home wages, supporting over 1.3 million people. read more

Geneva –  Life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s, according to this year’s “World Health Statistics: Monitoring Health for the SDGs”.Those gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic and in Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The increase was greatest in the African Region of WHO where life expectancy increased by 9.4 years to 60 years, driven mainly by improvements in child survival, progress in malaria control and expanded access to antiretrovirals for treatment of HIV, WHO said.  “The world has made great strides in reducing the needless suffering and premature deaths that arise from preventable and treatable diseases,” said Dr. Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO.“But the gains have been uneven. Supporting countries to move towards universal health coverage based on strong primary care is the best thing we can do to make sure no-one is left behind.”Global life expectancy for children born in 2015 was 71.4 years (73.8 years for females and 69.1 years for males), but an individual child’s outlook depends on where he or she is born. The report shows that newborns in 29 countries – all of them high-income — have an average life expectancy of 80 years or more, while newborns in 22 others – all of them in sub-Saharan Africa — have life expectancy of less than 60 years.With MAP read more