first_imgAustralia’s sporting clubs have the potential to recruit over 1.1 million Australian primary school aged children in sport if they can address the key barriers to their sport participation, according to a new research report released this week. Minister for Sport, Senator Kate Lundy said the report – Market Segmentation for Sport Participation: Children 5-13 years old – identified the key motivators, needs and barriers that underpin Australian children’s participation in sport.“Young children tend to be fans of sport, and we see large numbers of primary-school aged children getting involved in club-based sport,” Senator Lundy said.“But, this research tells us that older kids often see sports clubs as competitive and overly focused on performance. These things are taking the fun out of sports participation for some kids. “The challenge for clubs is to remember that kids just want to have fun, and kids will leave club-based sport if they stop enjoying themselves.”One possible approach to keep Australian children engaged in sport is the Playing for Life philosophy, which is based on the concept of game play and uses games rather than traditional drill training to promote sports participation.The Playing For Life philosophy was developed by the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) as a means to engage children of all abilities in junior sports and to provide positive sporting experiences. Touch Football Australia (TFA) has partnered with the ASC, through its Active After School Communities (AASC) program, to provide children with an introductory Touch Football program. The Playing for Life – Touch Football coaching manual consists of seven sequential, game-based lessons suitable for primary school-aged children of all abilities. The lessons are designed to assist people with minimal experience in Touch Football, to deliver fun, inclusive games in line with the Playing for Life philosophy.Playing for Life is an approach to coaching that uses games rather than drills to introduce the skills and tactics of a particular sport, or structured physical activity, being delivered. Each session is designed purposefully, so that the games progressively introduce and develop a particular skill that is the focus of the session. The emphasis is on providing safe, fun, engaging activities that ensure maximum participation from all children, regardless of their level of ability.The Playing for Life – Touch Football resource has also been designed to strengthen the link between school and community participation, supporting the AASC program as a link in the junior participation pathway. To view the Playing for Life – Touch Football coaching manual, please click on the attachment below.The Minister has also released new research that validates the Playing For Life philosophy with children aged from five to 12, with Playing for Life to be effective at creating fun and inclusive environments for sport participation.The Children’s Market Segmentation and the Playing For Life validation research are complementary tools that can help sports understand and better retain children within their affiliates (clubs).The research follows on from the Adult Market Segmentation study released earlier this year. Both are key parts of the ASC’s leadership role in guiding sport through the provision of evidence-based support, tools and investment to increase participation.More information regarding the Children’s Market Segmentation and Playing For Life research is available at ausport.gov.au.Related Filesplay_for_life_-_touch_football_02-pdfRelated LinksPlaying For Lifelast_img read more

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Hakan Calhanoglu pledges commitment to AC Milanby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveHakan Calhanoglu has pledged his commitment to AC Milan.The midfielder has been linked with a move to RB Leipzig this month.But Rossoneri boss Gennaro Gattuso has blocked the move.“I’m in Milan, I’m a Milan player and I’m happy here,” Calhanoglu told TRT Spor.“The rest is out of the question right now. I’m preparing for our match at the weekend.” last_img read more

first_imgLiverpool chief Moore full of praise for ‘charismatic’ Kloppby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool chief Peter Moore is full of praise for Jurgen Klopp over his impact at Anfield.Moore spoke of Klopp’s work since taking charge in 2015.”Jurgen is one of the more holisitic human beings you will ever meet,” he told Michael Robinson at FIFA’s gala this week.”He is able to keep the ship going straight, motivate not just the players but his staff, the coaching staff, the sports science staff – he keeps everyone on an even keel.”His personality is infectious. His charisma is without question”Even when you have lost he makes you think there is a brighter sunshine ahead.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgChelsea captain Azpilicueta tells Pulisic to keep his head upby Paul Vegas22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea captain Cesar Azpilicueta has told Christian Pulisic his chance will soon arrive.While the American has been less involved of late, Azpilicueta stressed he will have a crucial part to play in the coming months.He said, “As the manager said, we are a group, we are all important on this long path, we are only in October. Sometimes the manager has to make decisions, but I see him [Pulisic] working hard in training.”What I can say is to encourage him to keep working, because we know it is a new country, a new team, a bit of time of adaption is needed. I see him with the character working hard in training, and I’m sure he will be very important for us for the season.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_img Eight distinguished Jamaicans were on Wednesday, October 16, awarded Musgrave Medals by the Institute of Jamaica (IOJ), in recognition of their outstanding contributions in the literary, scientific and artistic fields.Leading the list of awardees were renowned composer and musician, Reinford Lee “Scratch” Perry, and Professor Franklin Knight, were awarded Gold Medals for their notable contributions in their respective fields.Mr. Perry has distinguished himself in the field of music as a songwriter, producer and talent scout, working with local and international stars such as Bob Marley and the Wailers, Paul McCartney and Lauren Hill.Professor Knight, a social historian, is Director of the Centre for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, where he became the first non-white professor in the history of the university to be granted academic tenure.Silver Musgrave Medals were also presented to author, Marlon James; Guitarist, Earl “Chinna” Smith; Author/painter, Franklin Bernal; and Climate change expert, Professor Michael Taylor.Mr. James has published two novels, ‘John Crow’s Devil’ and ‘The Book of Night Women’, the latter of which won the 2010 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction and the Minnesota Book Award.Mr. Smith, best known for his work with the Soul Syndicate band, has played an integral role in reggae music since its embryonic stages in the early 1970s. He has worked with some of reggae’s biggest acts, including Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Dennis Brown and Jimmy Cliff.Self-taught artist and author, Franklin Bernal, has made a significant contribution to the visual culture of independent Jamaica. In 1962, he painted the national symbols the Jamaican Coat of Arms, the National Bird, flower and the National Tree, which were used as the official representations distributed by the Jamaica Information Service (JIS).As the Director of the Climate Studies Group at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Professor Taylor has successfully positioned the organisation as a national and regional research entity to be consulted on matters related to the science of climate change, and has significantly altered the way climate change is spoken of in the Caribbean context.Additionally, Musgrave Bronze Medals were awarded to Poet and writer of short fiction, Dr. Pamela Mordecai, and natural products researcher, Dr. Trevor Yee.Dr. Mordecai has written articles on Caribbean literature, education and publishing, as well as collaborated on the writing of textbooks, children’s books, five books of poetry for adults, and a collection of short fiction.As the Executive Director of the Natural Products Institute, Dr. Yee has spearheaded the focus on identifying, extracting, and commercialising substances found in nature for the purpose of human growth, development and health.Responding on behalf of the awardees, Professor Knight expressed gratitude to the council of the IOJ for the honour and recognition. “You have honoured us far beyond any just measure of expectation and merit. Your elevation has both surprised us and forced us to reflect on the full meaning of the events of today,” he stated.The Musgrave Medal is one of the oldest awards of its kind in the Western Hemisphere. Presented for the first time in 1897, it was introduced as a memorial to Sir Anthony Musgrave, who founded the IOJ in 1879, during his tenure as Governor of Jamaica.A Gold medal is awarded for distinguished eminence, Silver for outstanding merit, and Bronze for merit in the fields of literature, science or art. Eight distinguished Jamaicans were on Wednesday, October 16, awarded Musgrave Medals by the Institute of Jamaica (IOJ). Story Highlights A Gold medal is awarded for distinguished eminence, Silver for outstanding merit, and Bronze for merit in the fields of literature, science or art. The Musgrave Medal is one of the oldest awards of its kind in the Western Hemisphere.last_img read more

first_imgNEW DELHI: Delhi Police busted a fake call centre and arrested 11 accused from Delhi’s Rohini district. Team of special staff, Rohini district swung into action and arrested 11 persons Prabhat Singh, Rupesh, Jitender, Robin Mathew, Dalip Singh,Vishal, Ranjan Garg, Vicky Dhawan, Raj Kumar, Ram Gopal, Jitender Singh involved in cheating innocent persons in the name of insurance plans and insurance benefits.The investigation was taken up on the complaint of a retired manager (63) from a Nationalised Bank, a resident of Rohini, Delhi regarding cheating in the name of insurance benefits and investment plans. He reported that accused persons had cheated him of more than Rs 20 lakhs by inducing him to invest in various insurance plans through tele-calling. Believing the tele callers to be genuine representatives from various reputed insurance companies, the complainant on various occasions between April 20, 2018 to May 21, 2019 deposited different sums of money in various accounts provided by tele-callers. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderLater in May 2019, when complainant insisted for refunds the tele-callers avoided him and demanded more investments. Realising that he has been trapped by some gang of cheats, the complainant lodged a written complaint with DCP Rohini. Seeing the gravity of the complaint, a case was registered and investigations were taken up. The police team started the analysis of the account statements of alleged bank accounts where the money was transferred and also simultaneously started the technical analysis of alleged phone calls. During investigation, 14 accounts were identified in various banks and branches where the cheated money of complainant was transferred and withdrawn in cash. All these accounts were being used to receive money through online transfer from various victims across the country, with the money being withdrawn from these accounts through self cheques and ATMs. “The analysis revealed money transfers of over Rs 13 crores in these fake accounts from about 225 customers or victims across the country,” said SD Mishra, DCP Rohini. The investigation led to the arrest of the whole gang. The interrogation of the accused persons revealed that an organized cybercrime syndicate was operating at the national level and had succeeded in duping 225 victims of about Rs 13 crores over past 2 years.last_img read more

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Port Cities – Cape Breton, N.S.(@Port_Cities) Aquakultre, Haviah Mighty, Port Cities and smrtdeath Facebook Advertisement smrtdeath – Winnipeg, Man.(@sloppymakeout) Twitter For the first time, this year’s winners will be joined by the 2018 winner of CBC Music Searchlight competition, Aquakultre (@aquakultre).This year’s winners were selected by a super jury, including industry leaders Derrick Ross (President, Slaight Music), Erik Hoffman (President – Toronto, Live Nation), Gavin Brown (Producer, Golden Goes Platinum), Jordan Evans (Producer, Golden Child Recordings), Meg Symsyk, (Vice President, International Marketing & Management, Entertainment One) and Allan Reid (President & CEO, CARAS/The JUNO Awards & MusiCounts).“We are excited to announce this diverse group of winners as the next generation of Canadian musical talent,” said Derrick Ross, President, Slaight Music. “We look forward to watching the growth of these talented artists and the opportunities the Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class has in store.”“CARAS is extremely proud to be in its fourth year of the Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class and continue to support Canadian music through this valuable mentorship program,” said Allan Reid, President and CEO, CARAS/The JUNO Awards & MusiCounts. “It has been an incredible experience to see the success of graduates of the program in previous years and I look forward to seeing the development of the careers of this year’s group of artists.”The winning acts will receive an all-inclusive trip to Toronto for an intensive mentorship week hosted by Canada’s Music Incubator at Coalition Music with industry leaders and Canadian artists. This will conclude with a music industry showcase night in Toronto. Additionally, the winners will receive a trip to the 2019 JUNO Awards in London, Ont., that includes transportation, hotel, complete access to JUNO Week events, and a performance slot at JUNOfest Presented by CBC Music; a two-day music festival during JUNO Week. One artist will be selected to perform in front of over 1,200 music industry elite at the JUNO Gala Dinner & Awards. The winners will be featured in exclusive content that will run onJUNOTV.ca, as well as receive studio time at Slaight Music Recording Studios.Partners of the 2018/2019 Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class are Slaight Music, and Canada’s Music Incubator at Coalition Music.For photos of the Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class winners please click here.Website: www.junomasterclass.ca, www.junoawards.caThe JUNO Awards: @TheJUNOAwardsSlaight Music: @SlaightMusicCanada’s Music Incubator: @CMincubatorAbout Allan Slaight JUNO Master ClassThe Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class is an initiative that provides the crucial tools to help the three winners develop their careers, build their own sustainable business and become “JUNO ready.” The Master Class includes a week-long customized artist development program co-developed with Canada’s Music Incubator at Coalition Music. This development program provides hands-on mentoring, networking, and collaboration opportunities.About CARASThe Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences/L’académie canadienne des arts et des sciences de l’enregistrement (CARAS) is a not-for-profit organization created to preserve and enhance the Canadian music industry and to contribute toward higher artistic and industry standards. CARAS’ mandate is comprised of four key pillars: Educate through our music education charity MusiCounts programs and initiatives, Develop emerging artists through mentorship and development programs, Celebrate Canadian artists with year round JUNO Awards showcasing, and Honour music industry icons through the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. For more information on The 48th Annual JUNO Awards or The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) please visit junoawards.ca.About Allan SlaightA pioneer of rock and roll, Allan parlayed his entrepreneurial flair with his knowledge of radio to create Canada’s largest privately owned multi-media company, Standard Broadcasting Corporation Limited.Born in 1931, Allan hosted his own radio program, Spins and Needles, a late night jazz program, at age 16 at CHAB in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. He moved to Edmonton in 1950, working his way up the ladder being appointed in 1956 as the National Sales Manager at CHED. There he came to the attention Allan Waters, owner of CHUM Radio in Toronto, who hired Allan to turn around the fortunes of his struggling station. Allan’s programming, promotions, and business acumen propelled CHUM into a household name. Allan left the station in 1966 to coordinate programming and sales of Radio Caroline, the infamous pirate radio station. He returned to Canada in 1967, to become the President and General Manager of Stephens and Towndrow.In 1970, Allan established Slaight Communications and acquired radio stations CFGM in Toronto and CFOX in Montreal. In 1977, Allan launched a new rock and roll radio station, CILQ-FM, known as Q107, in Toronto. In 1985, Slaight Communications sold CFGM and Q107, and purchased Standard Broadcasting Corporation Limited from Conrad Black. Under Allan’s leadership, Standard Broadcasting and Standard Radio grew from seven radio stations to a national network of over fifty. In 2007, the Slaight’s sold Standard Broadcasting to Astral Media.Radio was not Allan’s only passion. He served as a trustee of Women’s College Hospital (1978- 1982), a director of the United Way of Greater Toronto (1979-1987), director of the Shaw Festival (1982-1988), a governor of York University (1986-1987), and a director of the Festival of Festival (1989-1993).An inductee into the Broadcast Hall of Fame (1997), the recipient of an Honorary Doctor of Commerce from Ryerson Polytechnic University (2000), appointed a Member of the Order of Canada (2001), the recipient of the Walt Grealis Special Achievement Award (2005) for his contribution to the growth and development of the Canadian music industry, Allan has also maintained a lifelong interest in conjuring.About Slaight MusicSlaight Music was started in 2011 with a mandate to support the Canadian music community through a variety of initiatives, and to develop Canadian talent via strategic partnerships with industry peers.About Canada’s Music IncubatorCanada’s Music Incubator (CMI) is a national not-for-profit organization based in Toronto specializing in customized professional development and ongoing mentorship for artists and artist managers. CMI’s mission is to empower creative entrepreneurs, across all genres, in the development of sustainable careers and businesses, which meet their definitions of success. CMI also curates live events for partner organizations, which provide paid performance opportunities for artists, and works with industry partners, community organizations and all levels of government to support music sector infrastructure development. Since 2012, CMI has delivered over 5,000 hours of in-house and custom third-party professional development programs and actively mentors hundreds of artists and managers across Canada. TORONTO – The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) andSlaight Music today announced the winners of this year’s Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class: Haviah Mighty, Port Cities and smrtdeath. The winners, selected by a “super jury” of music industry leaders, will receive support from Canada’s premier artist development program allowing them to transform their careers with crucial tools and invaluable experiences.2018/2019 Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class winners: Login/Register With: Haviah Mighty – Brampton, Ont.(@HaviahMighty)last_img read more

first_imgOAKVILLE, Ont. – Tim Hortons’s franchisee advisory board has waded into a war of words between the brand’s parent company and an outspoken restaurant owners association, attacking the group for publicly slandering the company and making complaints about it to the federal government and in the media.In a letter sent to fellow franchisees this week, the board says recent “negative commentary,” much of which stemmed from the Great White North Franchisee Association’s criticism, is “corrosive and damaging to our brand, our livelihoods and that of our teams.”The franchisee advisory board has 19 elected members — all whom signed the letter — who liaise with company executives and advocate on behalf of franchisees.The letter was triggered by the relationship between parent company Restaurant Brands International and the GWNFA, which became tense over the last few months, after the association attacked RBI for cost-cutting measures in the wake of Ontario’s minimum wage hike, cash register outages and a $700-million renovation plan to spruce up restaurants. Their spat intensified in April, when a federal investigation was triggered after GWNFA wrote to Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains alleging RBI had failed to live up to promises made under the Investment Canada Act in 2014, when Tim Hortons was merged with Burger King to create RBI.The letter called GWNFA’s plea for a government investigation “a final straw.”“Without a doubt, this media attention has affected our brand in the eyes of the public – it has caused the public to watch and consider us more critically than they may have once done,” the letter said.“This second look has exposed issues that may have previously existed but were forgiven or overlooked. Issues such as service, accuracy or operational execution to name a few.”The board said it feared the public wrongfully perceives that GWNFA speaks for all franchisees and warned that “our guests are voting with their feet.”It noted that Tim Hortons had plunged from the fourth spot to the fiftieth in a recent annual brand reputation rankings survey looking at Canada’s most adored companies.RBI’s stock also took a dive, reaching its lowest point this month since September 2017 as internal strife between the GWNFA and the company became public.In an emailed statement, RBI noted it didn’t have anything to say about communications between the sparring franchisee factions, but said it was committed “to improving our relationship with all of our franchise owners.”“We realize we have work to do, and welcome all opportunities for dialogue with franchisees in pursuit of that goal,” the statement added.Earlier this week, Tim Hortons president Alex Macedo told The Canadian Press the company has a “good” rapport with the franchisee advisory board.On the topic of the letter GWNFA sent to Bains citing issues with RBI’s commitments to maintain franchisee relationships, the company’s rent and royalty structure for five years and existing employment levels at franchises across Canada, Macedo said only that “we have reported into Ottawa each and every year with everything we have done and we are happy to co-operate if anything comes up.”The GWNFA did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Board member Lou Gossner would not agree to an interview on the letter, but said in an email that “we look forward to moving past our recent differences and getting back to doing what we love: serving our guests, our team members and our communities.”Companies in this story: (TSX:QSR)last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says a frozen food company is recalling a line of chicken strips in British Columbia and the Prairies due to possible bacterial contamination.Pinty’s Delicious Foods Inc.’s oven roasted chicken breast strips have been recalled from B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba following tests by the CFIA.The agency says the pre-cooked fare may be contaminated with a strain of Listeria.The recalled cutlets were from two batches with best-before dates of Aug. 9 and Aug. 15.CFIA warns that the food may not look or smell spoiled but can still lead to sickness.The agency says that pregnant and elderly people are particularly at risk. Symptoms can include nausea, fever and muscle aches.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version identified Health Canada as the origin of the recall.last_img read more

John Isner became the top-ranked American male tennis player by playing his best tennis at home. He wins more than two-thirds of his matches in the U.S., but just half elsewhere. Tennis writers have portrayed Isner’s strength at home as a weakness abroad. But in his sport, where players set large parts of their own schedules, displaying a repeatable competitive advantage is an opportunity, not a liability.1Unlike, say, in the NBA, where an Eastern Conference team that struggles out west can’t replace trips to California with more home dates.Even as he’s pledged to solve his road woes, Isner has filled his calendar with U.S. events. His home-court advantage has helped him rise this month from the world’s No. 13 to No. 10. A couple of weeks ago at a tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., Isner reached the semifinals, where he took a set off No. 2 Novak Djokovic. This week in Miami, he reached the round of 16 but lost on Tuesday to No. 7 Tomas Berdych. In two weeks, Isner will seek to defend his title in Houston.These wouldn’t have passed for spectacular American results when Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras ruled the sport in the 1990s, or even when Andy Roddick and James Blake took up residence in the top 10 during the last decade. These days, though, pretty good is as good as it gets for American men in tennis. None of Isner’s peers got past the round of 64 at either tournament this month; he was the last American man at each by at least two rounds. And no other American man is ranked in the top 60 in the world. (There’s little reason to hope for better things from the next generation: No American ranks in the top 20 in either the under-20 or under-21 world rankings.)Isner is famous among casual fans for his role in the longest match ever played, which he won over Nicolas Mahut at Wimbledon in 2010, with the basketball-like 70-68 score in the fifth set. But he’s done his best work at home. Fourteen of his 17 career finals and six of his eight career titles have come in the United States. He’s been an entirely average player at the tour level2This means matches that count towards a player’s official match record: matches at Grand Slam tournaments, in Davis Cup matches and at ATP World Tour events. away from the U.S., winning 51 percent of his matches. At American events, he’s won 69 percent.“I always play my best in the United States,” Isner said at a press conference in Indian Wells. “A lot of times, especially in Europe, I have ‑‑ you know, I haven’t had great results at all.” He was at a loss to explain why, offering perhaps a lack of toughness at overseas tournaments. “There is no reason I can’t have a result like this outside of the U.S.,” he said.The reasons for Isner’s home advantage are varied. The obvious suspects, like the surface he’s playing on and the strength of his opponents, don’t fully explain it. A lot of it comes down to Isner himself.It’s true that much of Isner’s home success has come against weak competition. He has thrived at smaller U.S. tournaments that are optional for top players, who mostly live in Europe and don’t bother to make the trip. These events account for all of his U.S. titles and all but two of his U.S. finals. Just 6 percent of his matches at those events have come against top 10 players, none ranked in the top four. The relative weakness of his competition thanks to these events can be seen in the median ranking of his opponents over the last year: just 64, making his the softest schedule of any player in the top 35 in the world rankings.Isner also gets to play on hard courts, his favorite surface, at most of the U.S. events where he chooses to play. Just two are played on other surfaces: Houston, on clay; and Newport, R.I., on grass.These factors alone don’t explain Isner’s U.S. success, though. I pulled his career match record and ran a logistic regression, controlling for surface,3Isner has played 32 matches on grass, 66 matches on clay and 256 matches on hard courts. I separately ran the regression with each surface and also combining hard and grass, since so few matches are played on grass. The results were essentially the same. the ranking of his opponent4Technically I used the logarithm of his opponent’s ranking, since there is a much wider gap between the No. 1 and No. 10 players in the world — and therefore the probability of beating each one — than there is between the No. 10 and No. 100 players. and the value of each match, in ranking points.5The goal was to check whether Isner plays better in higher-leverage matches, those that count for more — i.e. matches in big tournaments, or later rounds of smaller ones. If he does, this effect could be confused with a preference for home courts. That’s because many of his U.S. events have weak fields, pitting Isner against early-round opponents whom he’d likely beat anywhere. That gives him more high-stakes home matches, so if he thrives in high-stakes matches, it might help explain his home advantage.To calculate the leverage of each match, I took the number of ranking points Isner would receive if he lost the match and subtracted it from the number he would get if he won, then lost the subsequent match. The result is roughly the value of the match, as prize money rises with ranking points and the points also determine a player’s subsequent seedings and affect his earning potential. The calculation is complicated by the ATP’s change in ranking points in 2009, so it isn’t exact, but since most of Isner’s tour-level matches came after 2008, the effect is small. Even after controlling for these factors, Isner remains a homecoming king. Surface, it turns out, isn’t a statistically significant driver of his success. Nor is the value of winning the match. His opponent’s ranking is highly significant. But independent of these factors, a 50-50 match for Isner away from home becomes a match he’ll win two out of three times in the U.S.Tennis isn’t usually associated with strong home-court effects, because of its individual and international nature. Many events draw fans from across the globe, who cheer for players from countries other than their own. And most players get few chances to play at home outside of the Davis Cup, the partisan international team competition that provides a rare home-court advantage in tennis. A popular explanation for home advantage in many other sports — that officials are influenced by partisan crowds — doesn’t translate to tennis because electronic line-call review at the sport’s top levels has greatly reduced the potential influence of subjective calls on match outcomes.Perhaps Isner thrives so much at home because of his background in college tennis, a level of competition where the team is primary. Isner starred at the University of Georgia and loves college team sports, spending much of a press conference last Saturday in Miami breaking down his NCAA men’s basketball tournament bracket. Isner counts on support from American crowds, and was taken aback by U.S. Open fans’ cheers for his opponent, Frenchman Gael Monfils, last summer.Isner lamented his inconsistency away from home in that Indian Wells press conference, and he’d naturally rather do as well outside the U.S. as he does in it. But if he had to choose between his unbalanced current record and, say, maintaining the same win probability everywhere, he should opt for the status quo. Ranking points and prize money nearly double at each stage of a tournament, rewarding players who alternate finals with first-round exits over players who consistently lose in the second round.6We can illustrate this by imagining a simplified five-tournament sequence in which each tournament has 32 players and five rounds. Points and prize money double each round, from one point and $1 for a first-round exit up to 32 points and $32 for a title.Player A, with one title and four first-round losses, would pick up 32 points and $32 for the title, and an additional four points and $4 for the other four tournaments, for a total haul of 36 points and $36. His record would be 5-4.Player B, with five quarterfinal exits, would get four points and $4 in each tournament, for a total of 20 points and $20 — barely half the yield of Player A, despite a superior win-loss record of 10-5.So inconsistency in tennis is good. Even better is predictable inconsistency. A player who doesn’t know when he’ll thrive can’t plan around it. Someone who does best at clay-court events can schedule as many as he can fit in. A player who plays best at home ought to schedule as many home tournaments as possible. Isner has learned that lesson. He has reaped the benefits of a tournament calendar that still features a significant number of U.S. events, even as players from other countries have ascended in the rankings.In addition to the U.S. Open and the mandatory events in Indian Wells, Miami and Cincinnati, Isner had 10 ATP events in the U.S. to choose from in 2007 and 2008, his first two years on tour. That number declined to nine, then eight and then, this year, seven. But the decline in American men’s talent has been even steeper during that time, making ranking points at those events low-hanging fruit for Isner. Combine the easy fields with his home-court preference, and Isner finds lots of success in places such as Atlanta, Winston Salem, N.C., and Houston — even as events he played earlier in his career in Indianapolis, Las Vegas, San Jose, Calif., and New Haven, Conn., have vanished.Early in his career, Isner didn’t choose so well for himself. In his first two years on tour, he opted to play just three of his 10 non-mandatory events in the U.S. But from 2009 to 2013, he managed to play 29 of his 53 optional events in the U.S., even though only one-fifth of such events took place there. Last year, the U.S. hosted eight of these events, and Isner played in seven. He reached the semifinals of six and the finals of three, winning twice.Isner has taken advantage of his home-court preference more wisely than his peer and frequent doubles partner, Sam Querrey. I ran the same analysis on Querrey, the second-ranked American man today. For Querrey, too, surface and leverage weren’t significant. He also showed a significant home-court advantage, though the effect was smaller and less significant than for Isner.7A 50-50 match away from the U.S. for Querrey would turn into a match he’d win 62 percent of the time at home. Yet after playing almost exclusively at home in his rookie year on tour, Querrey has opted to play events away from the U.S. almost as often as home tournaments, averaging one more optional road trip per year than Isner.Perhaps many players would show a strong, significant home advantage if they had the chance. None of the world’s top five players gets more than two or three home events each year. Players from the other Grand Slam-hosting countries — the U.K., France and Australia — have a few more opportunities. But those countries combined have about the same number of tournaments as the U.S.Tennis’s general move away from the U.S., and Isner’s impending 29th birthday, might keep him from entering as many home events in the future. He’s compensating by making more of his opportunities and stepping up at the bigger U.S. events, such as this month’s strong runs and his finals in Cincinnati last year and in Indian Wells the year before that. If Isner can keep improving at the big U.S. events, he won’t have to worry about getting better away from home. read more