first_img Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Related documents Letter Navi Pillay 2012.01.10PDF – 236.53 KB RSF_en Organisation A national Internet to better control the country? According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, Iran is preparing to introduce a global system for filtering all means of communication. In other words, it is preparing to launch a national Internet that is cut off from the international Internet. This is not a new project and Iranian officials have referred to it in the past. The government has had its technicians work on a “clean Internet” project since 2002 but the Ahmadinejad administration has stepped up the process.Reporters Without Borders questions the appropriateness and feasibility of such a project, not only because of the development and implementation costs but also because Iran needs to stay connected to the Internet for the purposes of commercial and financial transactions.“Is the regime moving towards a two-speed Internet, with access to the World Wide Web for the government, religious leaders, Revolutionary Guards and big companies on the one hand, and with the immense majority of the population limited to a censored Intranet on the other?” Reporters Without Borders ask. “In this case, the government would be guilty of grave discrimination against its own people.”Elections and Internet crimesAbdosamad Khoramabadi, the prosecutor-general’s legal adviser, unveiled “a list of 25 election-related Internet crimes” at a news conference on 28 December, the day for registration of candidates for the March 2012 parliamentary elections. This list was compiled by a working group that was formed to “determine the content that constitutes Internet crimes” under the Internet crimes law.The working group’s 13 members come from many branches of the government and judicial apparatus. They include representatives of the Ministries of Education, Communications and Information Technologies, Culture and Islamic Guidance, Intelligence, Justice, and Science, Research and Technology. They also include a representative of the Organization for Islamic Propagation, the head of IRIB (the state radio and TV service), the chief of police, an expert in communications and information technology designated by the parliamentary commission on mines, and a parliamentarian chosen by the legal commission. The prosecutor-general heads the working group. The content regarded as a crime includes calls for an election boycott and the publication of logos or content from opposition and counterrevolutionary websites.The Iranian Internet police (http://www.cyberpolice.ir/) published a new, 20-point set of regulations for Internet cafés on 3 January. Clients are required to show identification while managers must install surveillance cameras and must keep the camera recordings, along with all the details of their clients and the websites they visit, for six months. Use of software to circumvent content filtering, use of Virtual Private Networks and use of USB flash drives are all banned.After raiding 43 Internet cafés in Birjand (in the southern province of Khorasan) on 1 January, the police closed six of them for failing to respect security measures and the rules on the use of censorship circumvention software.Access to former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani’s website was blocked on 30 December, a decision confirmed on 3 January by prosecutor-general Gholam Hossein Ejehi, who said it was due to the presence of “forbidden content” on the site. In his Friday prayer sermon on 17 July 2009, a month after a crackdown on a wave of opposition demonstrations, Rafsanjani called for the release of the leading figures who had been arrested and for media freedom and freedom of opinion for regime supporters in order to restore calm. This sermon had remained on his website ever since.Iran is listed as an “Internet Enemy” in the list established by Reporters Without Borders. News IranMiddle East – North Africa March 18, 2021 Find out more Two bloggers sentenced to deathTwo jailed netizens, Saeed Malekpour and Vahid Asghari, were sentenced to death in January 2011 on charges of anti-government agitation and insulting Islam. The sentence has just been confirmed. The supreme court must now issue a ruling. According to Malekpour’s family, the sentence was confirmed in October by Judge Mohammad Moghisieh of the 28th chamber of the Tehran revolutionary court.Asghari, a 25-year-old information technology student, has reportedly been tortured while in detention. His trial took place at the end of 2010 but his family was only recently informed of his death sentence by Abolghasem Salevati, the president of the 15th chamber of the revolutionary court.New wave of arrests of journalistsThe Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, has waged an unrelenting war on journalists and netizens since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection in June 2009. More than 100 bloggers have been arrested and given sentences ranging from one to 20 years in prison in a paranoid response to the “soft war” waged by “Iran’s enemies.”The Telecommunication Company of Iran (TCI) is now partially owned by the Revolutionary Guards and, in practice, is under their control. The Organized Crime Surveillance Centre, which was created by the Revolutionary Guards, and their official website Gerdab have actively participated in tracking, identifying and arresting netizens. On 20 May 2010, Ebrahim Jabari, one of the Revolutionary Guard commanders, officially confirmed the creation of a cyber-army, which has been responsible for the targeting of “destructive” networks and the arrests of hundreds of netizens. Twenty-one netizens and 29 journalists are currently detained.Three of them, Fatemeh Khardmand, Ehssan Hoshmand and Saeed Madani, were arrested by plainclothes men at their Tehran homes on 7 January. Confirming their arrest the next day, intelligence minister Heydar Moslehi said they had “envisaged carrying out American plans to disrupt the parliamentary elections by using cyber-space and social networks.” This is a clearly trumped-up charge by a regime which, without any evidence, systematically accuses dissidents of being spies working for the United States or Israel.Madani, a sociologist as well as a journalist who has written dozens of articles in the independent media, was previously arrested and sentenced to six years in prison. Hoshmand, who is also a sociologist, has specialized in the history of the Kurdish people.Khardmand is a journalist with the monthly Gozaresh Sanat Chap. According to her husband, Masoud Lavassani, a journalist and blogger who was released in July after two years in detention, her arrest was carried out by four intelligence ministry officials with a warrant who said she was accused of “being in contact with the families of political prisoners.” Her state of health is a source of concern and their four-year-old son, who was already disturbed by his father’s long imprisonment, is in state of shock.Mehdi Khazali, who edits the Baran blog and has been arrested several times in the past, was arrested again on 9 January. According to his wife, he was injured in the course of his arrest, which was carried out in a very violent manner. Khazali is the son of Ayatollah Abolghasem Khazali, an influential member of the Council of Guardians of the Iranian Constitution for the past three decades. Despite his frequent run-ins with the authorities, Mehdi Khazali is very scathing about the government’s policies and human rights violations in his blog, which has been the victim of a cyber-attack and is no longer accessible.Harassment of relativesThe authorities use devious methods and do not hesitate to harass relatives or separate families.Fatemeh Alvandi, the mother of the imprisoned journalist Mehdi Mahmudian, was arrested on the orders of the Tehran prosecutor on 2 January and was interrogated for several hours before being released. Her son has been placed in solitary confinement and, according to the information available to us, has been mistreated. He was hospitalized twice in 2011 because he was seriously ill and was transferred to Rajaishahr prison. The prison authorities have systematically refused all parole requests.Parvin Mokhtare, the mother of the jailed blogger Kouhyar Goudarzi, has been sentenced to 23 months in prison by a revolutionary court in the city of Kerman, where she was arrested on 2 August by four men in plainclothes who forced their way into her home and took her to the city’s main prison. After her son’s arrest, on 1 August, the judicial authorities let several months go by without saying where he was being held. He is currently in Section 209 of Tehran’s Evin prison, which is the isolation section.Cooperation from western companiesThe Iranian government’s repression relies on the help it gets from foreign companies, especially western ones. Reporters Without Borders is astonished by the government’s ability to use the dummy companies it has created to circumvent US and European sanctions against Iran. The rules governing the export of equipment used for censorship and surveillance need to be revised. The procedures for tracking relevant equipment and software must be reinforced to prevent “banned” products from reaching dictators via third countries or obscure companies.According to the Bloomberg news agency, the Israeli computing security company Allot has for years been selling surveillance software and software that locates mobile phone and Internet users to the Danish company RanTek, which then resold it to Iran. The Irish company AdaptiveMobile Security has just announced that it is suspending sales of its SMS filtering and blocking systems to the Iranian regime.Reporters Without Borders supports the Global Online Freedom Act (GOFA), a bill currently before the US congress that would ban the export of Internet filtering and surveillance equipment to countries that flout online freedom of expression. In November, the European Parliament adopted a resolution in favour of reinforcing the rules governing the export of this kind of equipment and European legislation similar to the GOFA is also pending. Financial sanctions most be imposed on companies that ride roughshod over human rights concerns. Attempts could be made to prosecute companies that provide technology used for repressive purposes before the International Criminal Court on complicity charges.Read our press release about surveillance market January 17, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Death sentence for netizen confirmed, new arrests Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Iran News News Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders is shocked to learn that the supreme court has confirmed website designer Saeed Malekpour’s death sentence. His family said the court took the decision under pressure from the Revolutionary Guards. A Canadian resident who was arrested on 4 October 2008 while visiting his family, Malekpour, 35, was sentenced to death in January 2011 on chargesof anti-government agitation and insulting Islam.Arrests of netizens are meanwhile continuing. Simien Nematollahi, a contributer to the pro-Sufi website Majzooban (www.majzooban.org), was arrested at her Tehran home by intelligence ministry officials on 11 January on a charge of anti-government propaganda. Several members of the website’s staff were arrested on 7 and 8 September and were freed on bail on 4 October pending trial.Mohammad Solimaninya, the head of u24, a social networking website for Iranian professionals, was arrested on 20 January after being summoned before a revolutionary tribunal in Karaj, a town 20 km north of Tehran, on 10 January. Plainclothes intelligence ministry officials searched his home the same day, confiscating his computer, hard disks and CDs.His family still does not know why he was arrested or where he is being held. As well as running u24, Solimaninya has created and hosts the websites of many civil society organizations, NGOs and Iranian intellectuals.Reporters Without Borders is also concerned about Mohammad Reza Pourshajari, a blogger who has been held since 12 September 2010. He was tried by a revolutionary court in Karaj on 21 December 2011 on a charge of insulting the Prophet in articles posted on his blog and in letters sent to government officials while he was in prison.His daughter said the trial lasted a quarter of an hour and took place without his lawyer being present. The charge of insulting the Prophet is very vaguely defined but it carries a possible death sentence and is often used by the authorities to silence critics who try to defy the government.Reporters Without Borders wrote to United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay on 10 January voicing concern about the situation in Iran and requesting her urgent intercession.———Escalating repression in Iran: death sentences and national Internet 11 January 2012The Iranian government’s constant repressive policies towards journalists and netizens are being steadily ratcheted up as part of a generalized increase in persecution of dissidents and a reinforcement of online censorship.Reporters Without Borders sent a letter yesterday to UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay to share its deep concern and ask for her intervention. The report below was also attached to this letter. to go further June 11, 2021 Find out more Iran is stepping up pressure on journalists, including foreign journalists, in run-up to election Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists June 9, 2021 Find out more News IranMiddle East – North Africa last_img read more

first_img April 21, 2021 Find out more News Receive email alerts PakistanAsia – Pacific Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire PakistanAsia – Pacific The operations of the opposition Geo TV network’s profitable sports channel, Geo Super, have been suspended in Pakistan on the orders of the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA), which regulates TV stations, cable operators, Internet and mobile phones, and is responsible for developing access to information.“We are worried about the government’s growing harassment of certain media, especially those owned by the opposition Jang Group, which include Geo TV,” Reporters Without Borders. “We condemn any action designed to throttle this network by gradually stripping it of its main sources of income, and we urge the PEMRA to limit itself to its primary job of controlling licences rather than becoming a government censorship tool.”Geo News, which is also part of the Geo TV network, has accused the PEMRA of blocking Geo Super’s operations as part of a continuing campaign to harass news media critical of the government. The money-making sports channel is a key source of revenue for the network.At a news conference yesterday, PEMRA’s acting chairman, Abdul Jabba, blamed the fact that Geo Super has its headquarters in nearby Dubai. He said Geo Super was registered as an international channel, not a national channel, and therefore “does not have rights to transmit from Pakistan.” Geo Super also “does not have the right to cover any event in Pakistan,” he added.Geo News has often been the target of government harassment and intimidation in the past because of its critical stance. Help by sharing this information News to go furthercenter_img January 28, 2021 Find out more Organisation News News Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists April 8, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Government throttles Geo TV by blocking its profitable sports channel RSF_en June 2, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Pakistanlast_img read more

first_imgMortgage payment break for local authority home loan borrowers will be extended by a further three months Print Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Limerick on Covid watch list Previous articleVOTE An Ríocht for the Public Choice RIAI Architectural Award 2019Next articleFirst directly elected mayor vote could take place in 2021 Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email WhatsApp Linkedin Advertisement NewsJan calls time on “tenements”By Alan Jacques – May 30, 2019 236 center_img Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick county house prices to rise 5% in 2021 TAGSHousingJan O’Sullivan TDLabour PartyLimerick City and Countypolitics Facebook Labour Party Housing spokesperson Jan O’SullivanLIMERICK TD Jan O’Sullivan has called on Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy to rescind apartment guidelines that allow for shared accommodation, which has been labelled “21st-century tenements”.This follows cross-party, and industry, criticism of the plans to build large scale single-bed occupancy units with shared cooking facilities.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up O’Sullivan, Labour’s Housing Spokesperson, takes the view that if the Minister wants to genuinely address his “tone-deaf approach” to housing he must start by withdrawing the planning regulations he introduced that allow for co-living accommodation.“These units are being championed by speculators and developers and will result in cramped living conditions and new lows in standards for public housing. These modern tenements are ludicrous and not a solution to the housing crisis,” Deputy O’Sullivan declared.“I don’t know of anyone who would be excited to live in such a development.”Higher density living,  Jan believes, is the future of housing in Ireland. But she also maintains that Minister Murphy has “no ambition” for quality public housing.“There will be those who will seek apartments over houses for more long term living, especially in cities. But as we move towards this model of housing we still have to protect living standards. Just because someone is living alone, or in a smaller home, does not mean that they should need to be prepared to accept a one bedroom unit without living space or cooking facilities.“We need to solve this crisis by building quality homes in well-serviced communities. Jan went onto say that Labour recognise public housing is an “essential part of the solution to our current crisis”.“That is why we are committed to building 80,000 over five years which could be done for €16 billion if the ambition was there..”In response, a spokesman for the Department of Housing, explained that the guidelines set out policy in relation to a range of apartment types that are needed to meet the accommodation needs of a variety of household types and sizes – including households with children, students, older people and an increasingly mobile workforce.“This form of ‘niche’ development is not envisaged as an alternative or replacement to the more conventional apartment developments which are provided for elsewhere in the guidelines,” he added.Meanwhile, a spokesman for Minister Murphy expressed his disappointment to the Limerick Post “that the Labour Party is joining Sinn Féin in an attempt to cause confusion around CoLiving”.“They are attempting to destroy a concept, successful in other cities, by convincing voters that a planning application, which has not been granted, is Government policy. It’s dishonest. These guidelines were introduced 14 months ago and the Labour Party had no issue with them at that time. CoLiving is actually bringing vibrancy back into Georgian homes in Limerick City and I would urge Jan O’Sullivan to visit the development championed by LDA chairman John Moran and then speak to fact rather than political populism.” Limerick city house prices rise 4.9% as time to sell falls TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type!last_img read more