first_img Save Reputation Marketing Manager Johns Hopkins University Salary Not Specified Reputation Marketing Manager Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Financial Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Salary Not Specified You need to sign in or create an account to save Community Relations & Institutional Outreach Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Notre Dame of Maryland University Maryland, United States Salary Not Specified Similar jobs Save Program Officer II Maryland, United States You need to sign in or create an account to save Public Safety Officer More searches like this GeneralSummary/PurposeThe Office of Student Financial Services is seekingan exceptional individual to join our team as the AssociateDirector, Financial Aid Outreach. Reporting to the Director ofFinancial Aid and Scholarships, the Associate Director is a memberof the management team within the Office of Student FinancialServices. As a collaborative group, they work closely with theDirector and are responsible for the development and implementationof policies, procedures and communication plans to ensure thatOffice and University wide goals are successfullymet.The Associate Director, Financial Aid Outreach isresponsible for developing and executing a comprehensive financialaid outreach, student engagement, and financial literacy strategy,with a sharp focus on serving first generation and limited income(FLI) students. The ideal candidate is a highly motivated andinnovative professional, with outstanding interpersonal skills, acommitment to the principles of access and diversity, and providingthe best customer service and student support to our families. Thisposition plays a key role in ensuring that our outreach andfinancial literacy initiatives are cohesive, integrated, andaligned with the mission of Financial Aid, and will work closelywith the Financial Aid communications team. The individual in thisrole will also liaise with other key stakeholder offices toidentify opportunities to support both current and prospectivestudents as new initiatives are conceived, developed and launched,and will manage all aspects of financial aid for the BaltimoreScholars and Hop-In programs. S/he will have one direct report(Assistant Director, Financial AidOutreach).Specific Duties &ResponsibilitiesDevelop and implement events and programs toengage with students, and to help ensure the on-time renewal offinancial aid and retention of studentsConduct FinancialAid 101 workshops (in person and virtual) and Financial Literacytraining for students throughout theyear.Serve as theprimary point of contact for coordination and troubleshooting ofstudent financial concerns for other HomewooddepartmentsPerform outreach(phone calls, e-mails, text messaging campaigns, events, etc.) tocurrent and prospective students who need assistance navigatingtheir bills, financial aid renewal, refunds,etc.Work closely withthe Financial Aid and Admissions communication teams to ensure thatprogramming is uniform, cohesive, integrated, personalized totarget audiences, and aligned with institutionalobjectives.Oversee thecuration and promotion of financial literacy content and training,including (but not limited to) material from the Ocelotsystem.Help design anddevelop a non-credit financial literacy course available tostudents in both a synchronous and asynchronousformat.Work closely withundergraduate admissions to prepare financial aid packages forprospective Baltimore scholars and students selected for the Hop-InprogramAssessesperformance and success of programming and events throughsurveysWork with campuspartners, such as the Center for Student Success and StudentOutreach and Support team to extend our reach, impact and networkof support for vulnerable studentsGuide the officestrategy for the timing and delivery of events relative to othergoalsLeverage data fromin person visits, e-mail inquiry and phone calls to inform andshape future events andprogramming.Conduct High SchoolFinancial Aid Nights and other events for external partners asneededConvene and leadthe Financial Aid Student AdvisoryBoardStaff and supportthe financial aid presence in the Homewood Student One-Stop andvirtual equivalentsMinimumQualificationsBachelor’s degree required from a regionallyaccredited college or university.A minimum of 5 years professional financial aidexperience.PreferredQualificationsMaster’s degree preferred.Previous experience working in higher education,including exposure to admissions and financialaid.Special Knowledge, Skills, andAbilitiesExcellent interpersonal skills, culturalresponsiveness, and the ability to work in a diverse, matrixedorganization; the ability to work independently and as a member ofa teamAbility to thinkcritically and develop strategic programming to support studentsbefore, during and after HopkinsAbility to workeffectively under deadlines and simultaneously juggle severalassignments.Flexibility indealing with a very diverse culture, and commitment to diversityand to serving the needs of a diversepopulation.Classified Title:Associate Director FinancialAidWorking Title: Associate Director, Financial AidOutreach ​​​​​Role/Level/Range: ACRP/04/ME Starting Salary Range:Commensurate withexperienceEmployee group: Full Time Schedule: Monday – Friday / 8:30am – 5:00pm; Up to 37.5 hrs/week Exempt Status: ExemptLocation: 01-MD:Homewood Campus Department name: 10001447-Student Financial ServicesPersonnel area: Student AffairsThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) You need to sign in or create an account to save Twitter Facebook Program Officer II Save Public Safety Officer LinkedIn Share Johns Hopkins University Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore HomewoodCampus Maryland, United States Student Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimorelast_img read more

first_img Heat networks distribute thermal energy to multiple properties for the use of heating, cooling or hot water. There are around 14,000 heat networks in the UK (of which 2,000 are district heating and the rest communal), together providing around 2% of UK buildings’ heat demand. The Competition and Markets Authority’s (CMA) study – which began in December – set out to establish whether heat network customers were getting a good deal in areas such as price, quality and service levels.It has found that, for many, heat networks offer prices which are the same or lower than people on a gas or electricity tariff and have comparable levels of customer service.But some customers – mainly those living in privately owned or rented properties – pay more for their heat through a heat network and, across the board, heat network customers aren’t getting the same levels of protection that gas and electricity customers receive.The study found three main areas of concern: all suppliers adhering to mandatory rules and criteria around price and quality in long-term contracts Monopoly of supply – because customers often have no alternative sources of heat and may be locked into long-term contracts, they cannot hold suppliers to account on price or quality. To address these issues – and given the expected expansion in the market – the CMA’s provisional view is that the sector should be regulated. This will mean: consumer protections for all heat network customers, providing benefits such as complaints handling and access to an ombudsman and support for vulnerable customers Low transparency – before moving in to a property, people often don’t know that their energy will be supplied by a heat network and once people are living in the property, customer bills often fail to set out key information. The study covers the whole of the UK and the CMA is working closely with governments and stakeholders in all four nations. Heat policy is devolved to the Scottish Government but not to the Welsh Government. Competition and consumer powers are reserved matters for the UK government and are not devolved. Further details of the CMA’s market study can be found on the case page. Rachel Merelie, Senior Director, said:“Heat networks can play an important role in cutting carbon emissions and keeping down energy bills, but some customers are not getting a good deal for this essential service.“There is currently no regulator with responsibility for heat networks, so customers do not automatically benefit from the rights and protections that gas and electricity customers receive.“Our current view is that regulation is now needed, to ensure that heat network customers receive equivalent levels of protection to gas and electricity customers.”Some of our recommendations would require primary legislation. We are working closely with the UK government as well as the Scottish and Welsh governments to develop our recommendations.The CMA is consulting on today’s recommendations until 31 May 2018 and will publish a final report in the summer.Notes to editors: measures to improve transparency including better information on networks, provision of heat supply agreements or contracts and clearer and more detailed bills The study looked at whether customers are aware of the costs of heat networks both before and after moving into a property, whether heat networks are natural monopolies and the impact of differing incentives for builders, operators and customers of heat networks, and the prices, service quality and reliability of heat networks. The CMA launched its market study into domestic heat networks on 7 December 2017. Design and build – some property developers may try to cut the upfront costs of installing a network, resulting in higher ongoing operating costs, usually paid for by customers. Heat networks may also be installed where they are the best way to meet planning requirements, rather than the best solution for customers. Media enquiries should be directed to [email protected] or 020 3738 6460 / 07506710174. steps to improve the design and build of networks Market studies are carried out using powers under section 5 of the Enterprise Act 2002 (EA02) which allows the CMA to obtain information and conduct research. They allow a market-wide consideration of both competition and consumer issues. Market studies take an overview of regulatory and other economic drivers in the market and consumer and business behaviour.last_img read more

first_imgThe government aims to complete this year a study into replacing several aging fossil fuel-fired plants with renewable energy plants as it races against time to catch up with its green goals.The study, which began in January, not only includes mapping potential renewable sources but also future growth in targeted regions, the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry’s director general for electrification, Rida Mulyana, said on Monday. It is being conducted by state-owned electricity company PLN as the operator of the aging plants.”We are still gathering data right now,” said Rida, who is also a PLN commissioner. “There are a lot of plants and they are quite spread out. We can’t study them randomly, but this has to be done one by one. This needs time.” Energy Minister Arifin Tasrif first publicly announced the replacement plan in January. He said the government’s purpose was to simultaneously “supply energy at competitive prices” and chase Indonesia’s renewable energy commitments. “We are still conducting the assessment. We hope to finish as soon as possible,” PLN deputy president director Darmawan Prasodjo told The Jakarta Post on March 6.Read also: Indonesia plans to fuel all diesel power plants with CPO within two yearsIndonesia also has 23 coal-fired power plants (PLTU) that over 20 years old and 46 combined-cycle power plants (PLGU) of similar ages. The former have a combined capacity of 5,655 MW and the latter 5,912 MW. Most of these aging plants are located on Java Island.In comparison, PLN’s total installed capacity is 42,350 MW as of December last year, according to government data.Arifin has repeatedly said that Indonesia’s regions should use locally available energy sources, particularly renewables, instead of solely relying on fossil fuels. His statement reflects a principle enshrined in the country’s 2007 Energy Law.However, Indonesia’s largest electricity company, PLN, is also constantly being pushed by the government to sell electricity as cheaply as possible for the benefit of low-income households and major industries.The government imposes price limits for PLN electricity through Energy Ministerial Regulation No. 28/2016 on electricity tariffs. Such limits force PLN to invest in fossil fuel-fired power plants, whose fuel is kept at below-market prices through other regulations.Read also: Coal miner builds solar power plants to provide electricity in remote areasThe government’s Domestic Market Obligation (DMO) policy requires coal miners to sell one-fourth of their production domestically at US$70 per ton. The government is also allocating Rp 18.7 trillion ($1.18 billion) for fuel subsidies this year.“PLN has the target of selling the cheapest electricity in ASEAN,” said PLN’s strategic procurement director 1, Inten Sripeni Cahyani, in December last year when she served as the company’s acting president director.According to PLN data, the electricity company sells household electricity at an average of Rp 1,467 per kilowatt-hour (KwH). The tariff is the second-lowest in Southeast Asia after Malaysia, which sells at Rp 1,286 per KwH.Topics : Indonesia has 2,246 diesel-fired power plants (PLTD) that are over 15 years old, 16.2 percent of which are in Aceh, ministry data shows. These plants have a combined installed capacity of 1,778 megawatts (MW).“At the end of the day, it’s a question of how much efficiency can we achieve,” Rida added.Read also: Government issues regulation to jumpstart stalled renewable energy projectsSoutheast Asia’s largest economy aims to make renewables contribute 23 percent to its power production by 2025, yet regulatory headwinds are setting the country back from achieving the goal. Existing regulations stipulate that Indonesia should have reached a 17.5 percent renewable power mix by 2019, yet the country achieved only 12.36 percent that year.last_img read more