first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today VIDEO: Polish Navy Choses Saab’s Double Eagle System for Kormoran II MCMV VIDEO: Polish Navy Choses Saab’s Double Eagle System for Kormoran II MCMV View post tag: II Defence and security company Saab announces that the Polish Navy has chosen the Double Eagle system for the Kormoran II MCMV. Industry news The Double Eagle is in service with several navies, in the Baltic Sea, in the North Sea and around the world as a state of the art, well proven, low risk and extremely efficient mine countermeasures (MCM) underwater vehicle“This adds another Navy to our client list for the Double Eagle System” says Agneta Kammeby, Vice President and Head of Saab’s Business Unit Underwater Systems, “and shows that ROV’s stills forms the base for MCM in all modern Navies”.Jason Howard, Head of Naval Segment CEE, Saab Market Area Europe and Greater Middle East, adds “this is further proof that Saab’s efforts to position itself in the Polish naval market are starting to bear fruit. It is our belief that this achievement will increase Saab’s chances to secure additional business in upcoming naval projects in Poland.”The Double Eagle concept uses a modular approach to provide flexible systems for MCM and Maritime Security. It is aimed at providing a hydro dynamically stable, highly reliable system with exceptional performance and low life cycle cost. The Double Eagle, available in MkII, MkIII and Sarov versions, is used by navies around the world on many types of ships. It has also been adapted to the craft of opportunities (COOP) concept where the Double Eagle is integrated in a container that easily can be installed on almost any type of ship.The design was from day one targeted on modular design and open architecture with the possibility to replace main system elements. This allows upgrades and reconfiguration, enabling use of new technology and changes in naval tactics/strategy as part of an evolutionary strategy. This has led to a system where core functionality and core subsystems have been reused in several products and configurations, all to provide system with extreme stability yet still highly manoeuvrable.The new generation of Double Eagle is able to operate both as a battery powered AUV and a as a conventional tethered ROV. As a new feature the AUV will be able to find and by automatic dock with the tether while still in the water. This will enable download of collected data and recharge of batteries without any risky launch and recovery operations.[mappress]Press Release, June 10, 2014; Image: Saab View post tag: MCMV View post tag: Navy Share this article June 10, 2014 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Double View post tag: Eagle View post tag: Kormoran View post tag: Choses View post tag: Saab View post tag: Polish View post tag: system View post tag: Navallast_img read more

first_img View post tag: Submarine rescue Photo: Photo: Royal Navy View post tag: NSRS Share this article View post tag: SRScenter_img View post tag: Royal Navy View post tag: NATO Submarine rescue specialists from France, Norway and the United Kingdom gathered at HM Naval Base Clyde to take part in a NATO Submarine Rescue System (NSRS) training exercise.Over 110 people participated in the week-long event – the largest evacuation exercise ever to be planned at Faslane – bringing together military and civilian staff including submariners, divers, medics and Babcock personnel.The NSRS, which is jointly owned by France, Norway and the UK, is in three main parts – an intervention remotely operated vehicle (IROV), a submarine rescue vehicle (SRV), and the transfer under pressure system (TUP). The system is based and operated out of HM Naval Base Clyde.A speedy response time is vital in the saving of lives and with the system available to be transported anywhere in the world within a 72-hour timescale, it is important that this response is tested on a regular basis.This annual mass evacuation exercise – MASSEVEX – brings together all the partner nations to test the system and performance and provides an opportunity for the operating staff, medical staff, divers and pilots to meet and exchange their knowledge and experiences to enhance their collective capability and effectiveness.Maître Thomas of the French Navy said: “This is my first time attending an exercise of this scale and it has been a good experience, training with the other nations is an excellent way of sharing knowledge and learning from the experience of others. I look forward to being involved in similar exercises in the future.”As well as the partner nations, medical officers from the US Navy attended to observe the scenario-led training with the aim of developing relationships and sharing knowledge. Their attendance is valuable as the US have their own similar submarine rescue systems and there is a mutual agreement that each rescue system will provide back-up to the other if required.Commander Chris Baldwin, NSRS Operations Officer said: “The NATO Submarine Rescue System is a unique tri-national capability, with it’s base here in HMNB Clyde and it is an absolute pleasure for me to be in the role of the Operations Officer of this world leading rescue system.The NATO Submarine Rescue System is available to respond to a stricken submarine anywhere in the world. The equipment can be transported by road or air before being taken by ship to the location of the distressed vessel. Once there the SRV has the ability to dive to the submarine, engage with the escape hatch and begin the process of ferrying the crew to the safety of the waiting transfer under pressure system.last_img read more