first_img Comments are closed. A newweb-based recruitment service, which is to be launched in the next few weeks,aims to help HR managers and recruiters secure top-quality IT staff anddramatically cut the time and cost of finding the right candidate.Intagenis a software-based system that sits either on a corporate website or companyintranet and automatically sorts, ranks and scores candidates’ applications.Itis designed to manage applications from the broad mix of channels that HR andrecruitment managers have to deal with, including job boards, employmentagencies, direct referrals, as well as internal and direct applications. “Intagenenables companies to identify only the most appropriate candidate for theirvacancy. Companies will no longer have to plough through piles of CVs, resum‚sand manually filter and rank the application – only to miss the perfectcandidate,” says Brian Forbes, who co-founded Intagen with GordonDavidson. Thecompany claims it will be possible to cut more than 50 per cent of resourcingcosts, including the direct and indirect costs involved in identifying andinterviewing candidates, and hiring technical professionals.BothDavidson and Forbes have worked in IT for the past 12 years and are mindful ofthe scale of the crisis currently hitting the IT sector. Estimates fromstatistics and research company EITO show that by 2003 there will be 620,000more IT vacancies than candidates in the UK and 3.8 million unfilled vacanciesin Europe. “It’sno exaggeration to argue that there is a global war for IT talent. On aworldwide basis, virtually every private and public sector business isscreaming out for IT professionals and the situation is only going to getworse,” says Davidson.Intagenis based on a bespoke software package developed by Inform Software Solutionsof Glasgow and Infogistics of Edinbirgh, and supported by Oracle, Sun andHostmark technology. Because it is an Application Service Provider, there areno compatibility issues: HR and recruitment staff can access it seamlessly fromtheir own site or intranet. The system’s design and navigation have been keptvery simple, and Intagen could sit comfortably under the IT or vacanciessection of a site. Itsrange of functions includes: l Analysing CVs submitted in digital form andextracting the relevant details–Presenting CVs in a consistent format–Ranking and presenting candidates’ profiles against a firm’s specified criteria–Undertaking skills analysis such as psychometric and technical testing–Scheduling interviews.Companiescan add further testing to the system if they choose. Intagen plans to expandits own staff numbers from 16 to 120 people in the next three years tofacilitate proper client servicing and management. The system is HR-XMLcompliant.Companiespay a “negligible” monthly charge to access Intagen and then astandard rate for each client they recruit. There is no initial set-up cost.Potential candidates can register for free with Intagen.Reactionto date has been positive and the fact that the company managed to securefunding in the middle of last year when the dotcom bubble burst demonstratesits relevance. Itis too early to name clients, says Forbes – the system does not officiallylaunch until they have completed its testing – but he claims to have a numberof “letters of intent” from both UK and international organisations.”Thecompetition for candidates is fierce and no one wants to be left behind,”says Davidson. “Businesses realise that online IT recruitment needs todeliver far more simply than bulletin boards and candidate databases. That’swhy we have already been approached by major organisations in an attempt tohelp them combat the IT skills crisis.”www.intagen.com Intagen system promises to bridge the IT skills gapOn 22 May 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ There was little separation between Syracuse and Oakland. There was no celebration. But when Tyus Battle floated a contest step-back jumper from 15 feet out, there was no doubt. Syracuse fans took a collective seat.Syracuse fans don’t sit down after tipoff until the Orange makes its first basket. Thirty-one seconds into Monday night’s game, a 74-50 Syracuse victory, Battle hit that jumper. It provided SU fans a reprieve they had not experienced that early in a game since last season.In the season opener, Cornell’s Jimmy Boeheim drilled a 3-pointer in front of the SU bench. Against Iona, Syracuse didn’t’ score until nearly two minutes in. Saturday against Texas Southern, the Orange missed six shots and needed nearly three minutes to score a point. Even in both scrimmages, against Division II opponents, SU struggled to pick up momentum early.Not Monday night. Syracuse (4-0) scored first, went down 7-2 to Oakland (2-2), then systematically spread the basketball to produce 39 first-half points, a season high. Overall, the Orange shot an efficient 48.4 percent from the field, 37.5 percent from deep and four players reached double digits. Despite a pedestrian second half, it was the most productive start so far this season for SU. Against its most difficult opponent yet this season, per Kenpom.com, SU won its fourth consecutive nonconference home game to start the season.“Best game we played so far this year,”  said freshman forward Oshae Brissett, who finished with 11 points over 36 minutes.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJunior center Paschal Chukwu scored 12 points and added eight blocks, both career highs. Frank Howard dropped in a career-best 18 points and Battle had 25, three from his career high, which he set six days ago against Iona.  Meanwhile, Syracuse held Kendrick Nunn, who averages 28 points per game, to 1-for-9 at the half and three turnovers. Nunn finished with only 12 points and four turnovers as the SU defense made pockets air-tight inside the 3-point line.Syracuse plays next on Wednesday night against Toledo, which Oakland lost to by 13 on Saturday night. Then the Orange plays more formidable opponents in Maryland, Kansas and Connecticut consecutively. The early start Monday night functions as an encouraging sign for Syracuse ahead of those matchups, especially on the defensive end.“We got them into some spaces where they weren’t comfortable, and they missed their shots,” SU head coach Jim Boeheim said. “We missed a lot of layups tonight, missed a lot of free throws, and yet we still were able to control the game. That’s good. That’s a good thing.”Both Syracuse’s strong first-half surge, and its run in the second half to widen its lead to 25 with just over four minutes remaining, were marked by dominance inside. The Orange ranks first in the country in average height, per Kenpom.com, while the Golden Grizzlies rank only 247th. SU put particular emphasis on disallowing Oakland from making entry passes to the middle of the zone, said Brissett, who had three steals.The size advantage became apparent early, even though the Orange led the rebounding battle by only two at the half. Toward the end of the first half, Syracuse freshman forward Marek Dolezaj approached Oakland’s Martez Walker. As Walker rose for a dunk, Dolezaj reached and blocked him from behind.But a referee called a foul on Dolezaj, who slapped Bourama Sidibe’s hand and smiled. When he checked out because it was his second personal foul,  Boeheim high-fived him and smirked. He walked near a sideline referee, shrugged his shoulders and chuckled. Elijah Hughes, a transfer guard sitting out this year, told Dolezaj, “Hey, nice block.”The play epitomized Syracuse’s advantage. While a foul, Walker is four inches shorter than Dolezaj. He had little chance of a successful dunk. Overall, SU picked up 15 overall blocks, and several other shots were altered or forced because an SU player was looming inside. Even Battle blocked a 3-point attempt.Howard, who dished out six assists and picked up two steals, said the defensive effort is a sign of what’s to come. The 2-3 zone has more length this year. Rotations are cleaner than they were last year. When someone gets beat beatline, help comes. If a forward gets stuck outside on the wing, he knows how to compensate and get back in time. All of that added up Monday night in Syracuse’s 24-point victory.“Our offense wasn’t good most of the game, but our defense was good the whole game,” Boeheim said. “That’s important.” Comments Published on November 20, 2017 at 9:10 pm Contact Matthew: [email protected] | @MatthewGut21last_img read more

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A man uses a smartphone on the first day of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona The race to bring super-fast 5G wireless services to market is heating up with the first commercial deployments of the much-anticipated technology expected at the end of the year. Citation: 5G wireless race heats up (2018, February 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-5g-wireless.html Talk about 5G’s potential to pave the way to a world of self-driving cars, lightening-fast video downloads and smart cities have dominated the Mobile World Congress for years.But at the event in Barcelona this year, companies were full of concrete announcements of early versions of 5G uses.The first commercial 5G roll-outs begin this year and next in the United States, Korea and Japan, and the wireless industry is counting on the new technology to trigger a wave of growth in equipment sales and mobile services.China’s Huawei unveiled in Barcelona what it said is the world’s first commercial chipset that meet the standards of 5G wireless networks, which are better suited for virtual reality and high definition video.KT Corp, South Korea’s largest telecoms firm which exhibited several 5G services at the Pyeongchang Winter Games, displayed at the congress what it said was the world’s first 5G tablet.The telecoms industry only agreed to the first common 5G standards in December and analysts cautioned that the development of the network still has a long way to go.Much of what is being billed as 5G in fact “resembles more LTE++”, or an improved version of the existing 4G network in use in most developed nations, said Carole Manero, director of studies at IDATE, a French think tank on the digital economy.”There is a lot of marketing use of 5G,” she added.Huge investmentsThe next common 5G standards will only be announced later this year so “what is being proposed now is just a first version, many evolutions will follow, as was the case with 4G,” said BMI Research analyst Dexter Thillien.Tech firms are spending heavily to develop products that take advantage of the network’s possibilities. © 2018 AFP “We are investing heavily in 5G, nearly 600 million dollars per year in research and development,” said Huawei executive director and president of products and solutions Ryan Ding.Telecoms operators are also investing heavily to develop 5G networks for fear of falling behind their competitors.5G will account for 14 percent of global wireless connections by 2025, according to GSMA, the global mobile operators association. AI and 5G in focus at top mobile fair The first commercial 5G roll-outs begin this year and next in the United States, Korea and Japan Deutsche Telekom CEO Timotheus Hoettges has estimated the cost of providing 5G networks in Europe alone will be €300-500 billion ($370-615 billion).The telecoms industry will invest $275 billion in the United States to develop 5G networks there, Sprint chief executive Marcelo Claure said Monday at the mobile congress in Barcelona.Europe laggingWhile the European Union wants European companies to start offering 5G in 2020, spending to develop the network has been lower than in Asia or the United States.”The timescales vary widely on a country by country basis but the USA and China are the most likely winners to be the first” in 5G deployment, Nokia chief executive Rajeev Suri said on Sunday.He said he still believed some European operators would start to move up to 5G next year.In Europe telecoms firms are focusing their 5G efforts on business uses instead of by the general public as in other regions.European telecom operators are more cautious because the move to 4G by consumers was lower in Europe than elsewhere, said Thillien of BMI Research.”European operators know that demand will be low by the public. The y were burned by 4G and see that European consumers are more sceptical,” he added. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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