first_imgPink Floyd fans got some great news earlier this year, when the band announced plans to reissue their iconic discography on high quality 180-gram vinyl. The band started the process by rolling out four of their albums from the late 1960s, including The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, A Saucerful Of Secrets, More, and Ummagumma.Now the next batch of albums are set to be released, as Atom Heart Mother, Meddle and Obscured By Clouds will all see reissues on September 23rd. These albums mark the rise of Pink Floyd’s popularity, as Atom Heart Mother became the band’s first number one album in the U.K. Of course, Meddle will always go down as one the band’s greatest albums, as tracks like “One Of These Days,” “Fearless,” and “Echoes” remain some of the greatest compositions in the Pink Floyd catalog.We can’t wait to hear these albums, and future releases should cover beloved albums like Dark Side Of The Moon, Animals, The Wall and more![H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

first_imgDetroit Free Press 21 October 2018Family First Comment:  “Randy Hillard has travelled more in the past eight years than he has his entire life. South America. Dubai. Singapore. Sydney. But if he went through with his plan to go to Switzerland in 2010, those trips wouldn’t have happened. That’s because eight years ago, Hillard was determined to kill himself through an assisted-suicide organization overseas.” #rejectassistedsuicide www.protect.org.nzRandy Hillard has traveled more in the past eight years than he has his entire life.South America. Dubai. Singapore. Sydney.But if he went through with his plan to go to Switzerland in 2010, those trips wouldn’t have happened. That’s because eight years ago, Hillard was determined to kill himself through an assisted-suicide organization overseas.He was diagnosed with stage 4 stomach cancer just a few months before he went on a quest to kill himself. He suddenly realized he had become obsessive when he began planning his funeral.“It was one rather pathetic way of asserting some control over my life,” said Hillard. “Cancer was going to kill me, and I did not intend to die yet.”Hillard abandoned the idea after he heard about a drug called Herceptin. His oncologist at University of Michigan’s Rogel Cancer Center suggested he give it a try.Back in 2010, the drug had just recently been approved for stomach cancer patients and promised a slightly longer life expectancy — 11 to 13 months longer. It was a long shot: Only 20 percent of cancer patients have the HER-2 protein surrounding the cancer cell targeted by the drug.Hillard’s metastatic tumors had that specific protein. And eight years later, it still puzzles him … well, the statistics do. Stomach cancer at his stage has an 18-percent survival rate, and, not to mention, is one of the most uncommon cancers in America.“I wake up every day shocked at how non-dead I am,” he said.https://www.freep.com/story/life/2018/10/21/stage-4-stomach-cancer-randy-hillard-michigan/1674173002/last_img read more